Freaky snake egg hatchlings find in Sydney family’s backyard at Bringelly

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Freaky snake egg hatchlings find in Sydney family’s backyard at Bringelly

A massive nest of 110 hatched eastern brown snake eggs has been unearthed after a two-year-old child had stumbled upon a young snake inside a home.Sna

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A massive nest of 110 hatched eastern brown snake eggs has been unearthed after a two-year-old child had stumbled upon a young snake inside a home.

Snake catcher Kane Durrant found the hatched snake eggs under a slab where a clothesline previously stood at Bringelly in Sydney‘s south-west last Thursday.

Mr Durrant said he was expecting to find just one snake nest after the family called him out but was amazed to find the place had already been home to many of the dangerous reptiles.  

‘Now that’s WILD!’ he posted on his social media after he and his team discovered the eggs were likely from multiple females over several years. 

‘[It indicates] a communal, or at least annual nesting site,’ the post read.

'Now that's wild!' Mr Durrant posted on his social media after he and his team discovered the 110 hatched eastern brown snake eggs (pictured)

'Now that's wild!' Mr Durrant posted on his social media after he and his team discovered the 110 hatched eastern brown snake eggs (pictured)

‘Now that’s wild!’ Mr Durrant posted on his social media after he and his team discovered the 110 hatched eastern brown snake eggs (pictured)

Snake catcher Kane Durrant (pictured) found the hatched snake eggs under a slab where a clothesline previously stood at the residence at Bringelly in Sydney's south-west last Thursday

Snake catcher Kane Durrant (pictured) found the hatched snake eggs under a slab where a clothesline previously stood at the residence at Bringelly in Sydney's south-west last Thursday

Snake catcher Kane Durrant (pictured) found the hatched snake eggs under a slab where a clothesline previously stood at the residence at Bringelly in Sydney’s south-west last Thursday

It wasn't long after Mr Durrant had opened up the nest of snake eggs that multiple critters came slithering out of the popular spot (pictured, one of the young brown snakes discovered)

It wasn't long after Mr Durrant had opened up the nest of snake eggs that multiple critters came slithering out of the popular spot (pictured, one of the young brown snakes discovered)

It wasn’t long after Mr Durrant had opened up the nest of snake eggs that multiple critters came slithering out of the popular spot (pictured, one of the young brown snakes discovered)

Mr Durrant said he was expecting to find just one snake nest after the family called him out but was amazed to find the place had been home to many of the dangerous reptiles over the years

Mr Durrant said he was expecting to find just one snake nest after the family called him out but was amazed to find the place had been home to many of the dangerous reptiles over the years

Mr Durrant said he was expecting to find just one snake nest after the family called him out but was amazed to find the place had been home to many of the dangerous reptiles over the years 

The family had found seven to 10 young hatchling snakes in their front garden a month ago before their two-year-old child came across another deadly critter last week.

‘Another hatchling was found inside and nearly tailed by the two-year-old resident toddler!’ the online post said.

It wasn’t long after Mr Durrant had opened up the nest of eggs that multiple critters came slithering out of the popular spot, with his team working to capture them before they made their way into the residence, 

A baby brown snake was spotted and a one-metre-long red-bellied black snake ‘shot out’ when the snake wranglers lifted a concrete slab. 

Two bigger eastern brown snakes were also spotted ‘slithering at full speed’ from under the slab.

‘The two larger snakes may have been feeding on the newly hatched eastern browns or just hanging out in this obvious prime location,’ the post read.  

‘Both larger snakes were on shed with opaque eyes and rough skin likely due to the overload of food present – frogs, skinks and young snakes everywhere.’ 

Digging around a bit more the snake wranglers spotted two eastern brown snakes 'slithering at full speed' from under the slab (pictured, one of the hatchlings seen at the home)

Digging around a bit more the snake wranglers spotted two eastern brown snakes 'slithering at full speed' from under the slab (pictured, one of the hatchlings seen at the home)

Digging around a bit more the snake wranglers spotted two eastern brown snakes ‘slithering at full speed’ from under the slab (pictured, one of the hatchlings seen at the home)

After the snake catcher lifted a concrete slab, a one-metre-long red-bellied black snake 'shot out' (pictured)

After the snake catcher lifted a concrete slab, a one-metre-long red-bellied black snake 'shot out' (pictured)

After the snake catcher lifted a concrete slab, a one-metre-long red-bellied black snake ‘shot out’ (pictured)

'The two larger snakes may have been feeding on the newly hatched eastern browns or just hanging out in this obvious prime location,' the snake catcher's social media post said (pictured, the hatched snake eggs and skins)

'The two larger snakes may have been feeding on the newly hatched eastern browns or just hanging out in this obvious prime location,' the snake catcher's social media post said (pictured, the hatched snake eggs and skins)

‘The two larger snakes may have been feeding on the newly hatched eastern browns or just hanging out in this obvious prime location,’ the snake catcher’s social media post said (pictured, the hatched snake eggs and skins)

Mr Durrant plans to oversee the path being removed at the home at a later date so he can safely relocate the snakes.  

The eastern brown snake thrives in populated areas, a concern given its venom is ranked as the second most toxic of any land snake in the world. 

When disturbed the aggressive snake raises itself up and winds into an S shape ready to strike. 

Its venom causes progressive paralysis and can kill humans within half an hour if the bites are left untreated, the ABC said. 

Eastern brown snake

The eastern brown snake is a medium-sized snake, with a slender to moderate build and a smallish head barely distinct from the neck.

Their body colour may be almost any shade of brown, ranging from near black to light tan, chestnut or burnt-orange.

The species is widespread throughout eastern Australia, from northern Queensland to South Australia, including New South Wales.

There is also an isolated population in central and western Northern Territory.

In south-east Queensland, this species is particularly common around Beenleigh and Ipswich.

This species is active by day, although young eastern brown snakes are often encountered at night.

This species is dangerously venomous and has been responsible for many human deaths. 

The venom is strongly neurotoxic – if bitten, apply first aid and seek urgent medical attention.

It feeds on frogs, reptiles, birds and mammals.

The venom of this snake is rated as the second most toxic of all snake venoms in the world, second only to that of the Inland Taipan (which is also a native of Australia).

It contains a cocktail of poisons. 

The most powerful ingredient is a neurotoxin, which paralyses the nerves of the heart, lungs and diaphragm, suffocating the victim. 

It also contains a powerful procoagulant. 

Despite being home to so many species of venomous snakes, Australia records only about five deaths from snake bites per year. 

More deaths are caused by horses, or even bee stings, than by snakes.

By contrast, venomous snakes such as cobras and vipers cause many thousands of deaths per year in the very densely populated continents of Africa and Asia.

Most of the lethal snake bites recorded in Australia have been from Eastern Browns. 

They have learned to hunt rats and mice around farms and cane fields, and so tend to come in contact with humans more often than other venomous snakes.

Most snakes bites occur when someone is trying to kill or catch a snake.

Sources: Billabong Sanctuary, Queensland Museum, Australian Museum 

Source: | This article originally belongs to Dailymail.co.uk

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