[ad_1]

Gabby Logan has admitted that her two children Reuben and Lois cringe when she talks about her sex life with her husband Kenny.

As the TV presenter, 50, started discussing what the intimacy with her rugby ace husband Kenny, 50, was like following his prostate cancer diagnosis, she didn’t want to go into too much detail.

The mother-of-two quipped that her children will go ‘mental’ if she continues speaking about sex, because they feel ‘she has already said enough’ on the subject.

Speaking to The Times, Gabby said: ‘I mean, I won’t talk about it in too much detail, my kids will go mental as they think I’ve already said enough.

‘But I think why it was important is because it is a taboo subject that people don’t really want to talk about.’

Gabby Logan, 50, has admitted that her two children Reuben and Lois, 17, cringe when she talks about her sex life with their father Kenny, 50

Gabby Logan, 50, has admitted that her two children Reuben and Lois, 17, cringe when she talks about her sex life with their father Kenny, 50

The mother-of-two quipped that her children will go 'mental' if she continues speaking about sex, because they feel 'she has already said enough' on the subject

The mother-of-two quipped that her children will go ‘mental’ if she continues speaking about sex, because they feel ‘she has already said enough’ on the subject

She and her husband, Scottish rugby player Kenny have been married for 20 years and welcomed their twins through IVF

Kenny was diagnosed with cancer in February 2022 after Gabby urged him to go to the doctors. 

Last year, Kenny thankfully received the all-clear and while he says he is at ‘100 per cent’ mentally and physically he admits that his sex life is not ‘consistent’.

He got extremely candid about the after-effects of treatment, saying they left him ‘black and blue downstairs’.

Speaking to The Telegraph, he said: ‘Whether it be my dyslexia, my relationship, IVF, we’ve always been quite open. So, I was quite happy to talk about erectile dysfunction and all these other things because I was like, “It is a symptom”.’ 

Kenny went on: ‘From a sexual point of view, it’s not consistent. As the surgeon said to me, this could take 18 months. Within a month, I was getting movement, where he says, “That’s amazing”. So it’s just not as consistent. The beauty is you can take a tablet and it changes things.’

He explained that his brave honesty was motivated by his desire to help other people.

Reiterating the need for all men his age to get checked, he said: ‘If I can help one person, that’d be great. But I’ve probably helped a lot of people with the coverage it had.’

As the TV presenter started discussing what the intimacy with her rugby ace husband Kenny was like following his prostate cancer diagnosis, she didn't want to go into too much detail

As the TV presenter started discussing what the intimacy with her rugby ace husband Kenny was like following his prostate cancer diagnosis, she didn’t want to go into too much detail

Speaking to The Times, Gabby said: 'I mean, I won’t talk about it in too much detail, my kids will go mental as they think I’ve already said enough'

Speaking to The Times, Gabby said: ‘I mean, I won’t talk about it in too much detail, my kids will go mental as they think I’ve already said enough’

Kenny was diagnosed with cancer in February 2022 after Gabby urged him to go to the doctors

Kenny was diagnosed with cancer in February 2022 after Gabby urged him to go to the doctors

Last year, Kenny thankfully received the all-clear and while he says he is at '100 per cent' mentally and physically he admits that his sex life is not 'consistent'

Last year, Kenny thankfully received the all-clear and while he says he is at ‘100 per cent’ mentally and physically he admits that his sex life is not ‘consistent’

He got extremely candid about the after-effects of treatment, saying they left him 'black and blue downstairs'

He got extremely candid about the after-effects of treatment, saying they left him ‘black and blue downstairs’

She and her husband, Scottish rugby player Kenny have been married for 20 years and welcomed their twins through IVF

She and her husband, Scottish rugby player Kenny have been married for 20 years and welcomed their twins through IVF

Kenny appeared on BBC Breakfast in September with his wife and said he had no symptoms and ‘had to go looking for it’ in a stark warning about how insidious prostate cancer can be.

‘I literally fell over,’ he said of the February 7 diagnosis. ‘I didn’t see it coming. No symptoms whatsoever… It’s hard.

‘I found I had prostate cancer by accident. If you have symptoms it might be too late. Guys go get tested, simple and could save your life.’

The couple said Logan was ‘extremely lucky’ they caught it early, which afforded him options regarding treatment.

Kenny was inspired to go for a general check up after hearing guests on his wife’s podcast discuss having their hormones tested. And when he did his results showed a high level of PSA – prostate-specific antigen.

‘I got checked and very quickly, within three to four months, I had a biopsy and they said there was something there but they’d keep an eye on it,’ he said.

He said what stood out the most from that appointment was the specialist telling him ’40 per cent of [his] mates have got this [high PSA levels] but don’t know’. It doesn’t always lead to cancer and many men go their entire lives not knowing.

So when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer a short time later, Logan recalled it being ‘a huge shock’.

Sticking together: Kenny hopes his diagnosis will fuel more open discussions in the community, noting men are particularly 'notorious' for suffering in silence and not scheduling regular check ups with doctors

Sticking together: Kenny hopes his diagnosis will fuel more open discussions in the community, noting men are particularly ‘notorious’ for suffering in silence and not scheduling regular check ups with doctors 

He made the decision to remove the prostate entirely and is now three months post operation feeling almost as good as new.

‘I’m probably about 90 per cent back to normal,’ he said.

Gabby spoke about his tough journey back to good health, noting her husband appeared entirely fine right up until the day of the operation.

‘He did a bike session, he had no pain, no symptoms and to go in and have… a really invasive surgery, it obviously takes a long time to recover from,’ she said.

‘You’re going to feel a lot worse off after it… but [we’re] very, very, very lucky.’

Kenny hopes his diagnosis will fuel more open discussions in the community, noting men are particularly ‘notorious’ for suffering in silence and not scheduling regular check ups with doctors.

Prostate cancer can often be treated if caught early, but symptoms usually do not show up until the cancer is already in advanced states.

It is the most common cancer in men in the UK. The couple are encouraging men to learn more about the disease and consider talking to their GP about the risks.

Every year, upwards of 52,300 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer in the UK – more than 140 every day.

Up to 11,800 men in Britain die from prostate cancer annually, meaning it trails only lung and bowel cancer in yearly fatalities.

WHAT IS PROSTATE CANCER?

How many people does it kill? 

More than 11,800 men a year – or one every 45 minutes – are killed by the disease in Britain, compared with about 11,400 women dying of breast cancer.

It means prostate cancer is behind only lung and bowel in terms of how many people it kills in Britain. 

In the US, the disease kills 26,000 men each year.

Despite this, it receives less than half the research funding of breast cancer and treatments for the disease are trailing at least a decade behind.

How many men are diagnosed annually?

Every year, upwards of 52,300 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer in the UK – more than 140 every day.   

How quickly does it develop? 

Prostate cancer usually develops slowly, so there may be no signs someone has it for many years, according to the NHS

If the cancer is at an early stage and not causing symptoms, a policy of ‘watchful waiting’ or ‘active surveillance’ may be adopted. 

Some patients can be cured if the disease is treated in the early stages.

But if it is diagnosed at a later stage, when it has spread, then it becomes terminal and treatment revolves around relieving symptoms.

Thousands of men are put off seeking a diagnosis because of the known side effects from treatment, including erectile dysfunction.

Tests and treatment

Tests for prostate cancer are haphazard, with accurate tools only just beginning to emerge. 

There is no national prostate screening programme as for years the tests have been too inaccurate.

Doctors struggle to distinguish between aggressive and less serious tumours, making it hard to decide on treatment.

Men over 50 are eligible for a ‘PSA’ blood test which gives doctors a rough idea of whether a patient is at risk.

But it is unreliable. Patients who get a positive result are usually given a biopsy which is also not fool-proof. 

Scientists are unsure as to what causes prostate cancer, but age, obesity and a lack of exercise are known risks. 

Anyone with any concerns can speak to Prostate Cancer UK’s specialist nurses on 0800 074 8383 or visit prostatecanceruk.org

[ad_2]

This post first appeared on Daily mail

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

Why you get stitches during exercise 

[ad_1] The real reason behind why we get stitches when we exercise…

COVID-19 infection rate low among rural health care workers

Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain Antibody testing of health care workers in three…

Shared genetic architecture between COVID-19 severity and other health conditions

  Researchers in the United States have identified a shared genetic architecture…

Rory McIlroy pulls out of Rio Olympics 2016 over fears about the Zika virus

Rory McIlroy has pulled out of the Olympics over fears about the…