A Derbyshire police officer who had threesome with a drunken woman and his colleague in a patrol car was found guilty of misconduct, but has been bailed so he can spend Christmas with his family.

PC Matthew Longmate, 47, and his colleague PC Daniel Nash engaged in sexual activity with a woman in a police car after she was ejected from a nightclub in October 2015, Southwark Crown Court heard.

Jurors were told that the woman had intercourse with Nash, 41, while leaning into the front of the car and giving Longmate oral sex. 

Longmate was found guilty of one count of misconduct in public office by a jury at Southwark Crown Court yesterday. He will be sentenced on January 15 next year.

Nash pleaded guilty to 14 counts of misconduct in public office earlier this year. He was handed a suspended jail sentence in August because he had bowel cancer and was given just six months to live. He died one month after sentencing.

PC Matthew Longmate, 47, (pictured) was found guilty of one count of misconduct in public office by a jury at Southwark Crown Court yesterday. He will be sentenced on January 15

PC Matthew Longmate, 47, (pictured) was found guilty of one count of misconduct in public office by a jury at Southwark Crown Court yesterday. He will be sentenced on January 15

PC Matthew Longmate, 47, (pictured) was found guilty of one count of misconduct in public office by a jury at Southwark Crown Court yesterday. He will be sentenced on January 15

Longmate and his colleague PC Daniel Nash, 41, (pictured) engaged in sexual activity with a woman in a police car after she was ejected from a nightclub in October 2015, Southwark Crown Court heard

Longmate and his colleague PC Daniel Nash, 41, (pictured) engaged in sexual activity with a woman in a police car after she was ejected from a nightclub in October 2015, Southwark Crown Court heard

Longmate and his colleague PC Daniel Nash, 41, (pictured) engaged in sexual activity with a woman in a police car after she was ejected from a nightclub in October 2015, Southwark Crown Court heard

Both Longmate and Nash were in uniform on October 4, 2015 when they engaged in sexual activity with the woman, the court has told. 

The prosecution said the woman was ‘extremely drunk’ and ‘does not remember’ the incident, but ‘concluded she must have consented to what had taken place’.

‘Although she is extremely embarrassed and would never have acted in this way had she been sober,’ Prosecutor Jocelyn Ledward said.

‘She did not make any report about this at the time, but did mention her encounter to a friend.’ 

DCC Simon Blatchly yesterday said that Longmate had been found guilty of a ‘truly horrendous crime’ and that he has ‘no place in policing’.

‘As a serving police officer he took an oath to uphold the laws of this country – and protect our communities from harm. In particular, officers and staff, have a particular duty to protect those who are most vulnerable,’ DCC Blatchly said.

‘Longmate not only failed to protect, but actively sought to abuse his position while on patrol. From the evidence that was found this appears to have been a single incident and he committed his offence in collusion with former PC Daniel Nash.’

Following the guilty verdict,an accelerated hearing will take place to remove Longmatge from the force.

‘I am deeply shocked and angered by his actions, as I know officers and staff are across the force,’ the deputy chief constable added.

‘However, I want to be clear that the independent investigation into this matter by the Independent Office for Police Conduct found no wider knowledge or offending by any other officer or staff member.

‘If you know of any officer or staff member who is behaving in a manner that does not fit their role as a member of Derbyshire Constabulary, then I would urge you to contact the force, or, contact the independent charity CrimeStoppers, who can take anonymous reports in order for them to be investigated.’

Steve Noonan, the IOPC Director of Major Investigations Steve Noonan, echoed DCC Blatchly’s remarks, adding that Longmate and Nash ‘abused their position as police officers in a way that is a complete betrayal of the public trust placed in them’.

He said: ‘PC Longmate targeted a lone woman who was in a vulnerable position in a town centre late at night. She should have felt safe in this situation.

‘Police officers who abuse their power for sexual gain not only discredit their profession but breach the public’s trust and seriously undermines confidence in the police service.

‘I recognise how difficult it must have been for the woman in this case to come forward and I want to thank her for providing evidence to the investigation and helping to ensure that PC Longmate has been held accountable.’

The two police officers are said to have offered the woman a lift home following an incident at the Association Bar

The two police officers are said to have offered the woman a lift home following an incident at the Association Bar

The two police officers are said to have offered the woman a lift home following an incident at the Association Bar

The court also heard how ‘predatory’ Nash used his job to pursue relationships with 13 women. He targeted vulnerable women, including victims of domestic violence between January 2015 and December 2020.

Nash pleaded guilty to 14 counts of misconduct in public office earlier this year and was handed a two-year suspended sentence in August due to his ‘ill health’. He died the following month.

His sentencing can now be reported following the trial and conviction of Longmate.

‘He had been a Derbyshire police constable for 18 years,’ Ms Ledward said. ‘Prior to his arrest he was stationed at Chesterfield Police Station. He resigned whilst under investigation.

‘Nash used his position as a police officer to forge sexual relationships with a number of female members of the public… many of whom would appear to have been either vulnerable generally, or at a particularly vulnerable time in their lives, often as victims, witnesses or suspects in criminal investigations’

In one instance, Nash was photographed having sex with one of his victims on a black leather lounge settee. The image, circulated online, showed the officer in full uniform wearing his utility belt with his handcuffs visible.

The woman claimed that on a night out in around 2015, she went back a friend’s flat and recalled a police officer entering the lounge.

Ms Ledward told the court: ‘He was wearing a police uniform. She was under the influence of alcohol. It seems that a photograph was taken that evening without her knowledge, and subsequently came to be circulated online.’

The photograph, which the prosecutor said ‘obviously shows sexual activity’, was drawn to her attention in early 2021.  

‘She said that seeing the photograph has really upset her. She doesn’t say she would not have consented to what was taking place, but she just cannot remember it,’ Ms Ledward told the jury.

‘The prosecution case is that on this occasion, Daniel Nash wilfully misconducted himself by engaging in sexual activity with a woman who was intoxicated (to the extent she cannot remember what took place), and therefore vulnerable, whilst he was on duty and acting in his capacity as a police officer.’

Ms Ledward said in April 2020 one of the women complained to police that she had been contacted by Nash via Facebook Messenger, asking her if she had been in the cells that day, and ‘asking if she would sleep with him in exchange for £500.’

Nash was first arrested on 24 November 2020 and various devices were seized.

Analysis of his phone ‘resulted in the identification of numerous women who feature on police databases, with whom he appeared to have had contact which was not all explicable as a result of his role.’

In November 2020 he visited a shoplifter at her home and had sex with her after they exchanged texts, the court heard.

Another woman, described as a ‘high-risk victim of domestic violence’, said she had sexual intercourse with Nash at her home address

‘This was whilst he was in uniform,’ said the prosecutor. ‘He said he was dropped off by another officer. She had him as a friend on Facebook and messaged him on Instagram as recently as the previous week.

‘She said he had attended quite a few domestic violence incidents involving her, had taken statements from her, and used to contact her and pop round to check on her.

‘He had given her his personal number. He made her feel safe, as she was in genuine fear of her former partner at the time, but also as if she had to answer the door as he was a policeman in uniform.’

Ms Ledward told the court that at the time the pair had sex, the woman believed that she was ‘the only one’ in married Nash’s life ‘as he was not wearing a wedding ring.’ 

PC Longmate, also of Chesterfield, denied but was convicted of one charge of misconduct in relation to the incident in the patrol car with Nash on October 4, 2015. Longamte is pictured in September 2022

PC Longmate, also of Chesterfield, denied but was convicted of one charge of misconduct in relation to the incident in the patrol car with Nash on October 4, 2015. Longamte is pictured in September 2022

PC Longmate, also of Chesterfield, denied but was convicted of one charge of misconduct in relation to the incident in the patrol car with Nash on October 4, 2015. Longamte is pictured in September 2022

Another domestic abuse victim claimed Nash asked for her mobile phone and exchanged ‘flirtatious messages’ with her about searching her knicker drawer.

‘He attempted to make arrangements to see her the following evening,’ said Ms Ledward. ‘Having been warned by a friend that Mr Nash was married, she stopped further contact and did not meet him.’

Another domestic abuse victim said of her dealings with Nash: ‘I had spent the last 5 years getting my head bashed in by and the person that I thought was trying to help me then tried it on with me. I was shocked but I had so much s**t going on at the time I couldn’t deal with it’.

A mother-of-two was seen by Nash after a complaint of child abuse was made against her.

‘Nash was the reporting officer for that allegation,’ said the prosecutor. ‘A colleague of Nash had heard through others that Nash was in a relationship with the woman.

‘When the officer had cause to give Daniel Nash a lift home after a shift, he asked him whether the rumour was true.

‘Daniel Nash confirmed he had slept with her and when asked where the sexual activity had taken place, he said it was in his marital bed.’

A short time after, the woman called the investigation team indicating that she wished to add to her account that she had ‘in fact been involved in a sexual relationship with him.’

She later claimed that Nash initially suggested that they meet for a coffee or that she should go to his house for breakfast.

‘Within a week of receiving the message she attended his home address,’ said the prosecutor. ‘Daniel Nash was not wearing his uniform, he opened a bottle of prosecco and things quickly progressed to sexual intercourse taking place throughout the house.’

Ms Ledward detailed the remaining misconduct charged which involved Nash exchanging messages with women on SnapChat and Facebook Messenger in an attempt to initiate relationships.

He repeatedly messaged one victim until she said she knew he was married.

A number of victim impact statements were read out in which the women said that they no longer trusted the police.

One said: ‘It would have to be a matter of life or death for me to call the police.’

Another woman said: ‘I want to be able to call the police if I need help but things would have to be really bad for me to make that call.’

‘Nash destroyed what little trust I had.’

‘He came across as caring but looking back I see that he was sneaky and sly…’

‘It is sad that my trust has been broken. It will take a long time to get that back.’

Nash, of Chesterfield, admitted 14 counts of misconduct against him on October 18, 2022. The court was told the former officer was suffering from bowel cancer and had about six months to live.

He attended the hearing via video link from his home as Julian King, defending, said: ‘This defendant expresses his shame, regret, and sorrow.

‘He has reflected on the damage caused for his family, for his friends and for his profession.’

Referring to Nash’s terminal illness Mr King said: ‘This is a relatively young defendant with relatively young children. His life will sadly be cut short.

‘Incarceration would be disproportionate to the overall sentencing aims. This defendant has not sought to use his diagnosis as a shield.’

Mr King said sending Nash to prison would ‘prevent his children from having time with their father at a crucial stage.’

Judge Tony Baumgartner told him: ‘You used your position as a police officer to bring about with these women or to initiate or pursue sexual relations with them.

‘The victims were vulnerable because of the circumstances in which you found them, whether that was because they were under the influence of alcohol, the victims of domestic violence-which was a feature of many of the counts-, or as suspects under investigation.’

‘A common theme throughout is your insatiable desire to take advantage of vulnerable women and form sexual relationships with them.

‘These women were often at their lowest ebb, as their victim personal statements have shown.’

‘Most of the women were much younger than you. Many felt humiliated, exploited and degraded by what you did to them.’

‘They felt betrayed by your conduct.’

Judge Baumgartner emphasised that Nash’s actions were damaging to the reputation of the police force as a whole.

‘On occasion you would use sensitive policing data to check on or contact your victims,’ he said. ‘You must have been aware of the high degree of trust placed in police officers conducting work of this kind.’

Judge Baumgartner told Nash that his behaviour ‘has a wider impact on the standing of the police in the eyes of the public at large.’

But he gave Nash credit for pleading guilty at the earliest possible opportunity, and for his work as a police officer.

Nash had received commendations for bravery in 2015 and 2016, and was awarded a Royal Humane Society Award for stopping a man from jumping under a train.

The judge acknowledged Nash was dying from terminal colon cancer and said sending him to prison would reduce the amount of time his family would be able to spend with him.

Judge Baumgartner said: ‘Daniel Nash, you are dying. The cancer you are suffering from is cruel and painful. I cannot help but feel the utmost pity for you, your wife and your children given your prognosis.

‘The victims must have justice for what was done to them. Justice must be done, but what is justice if not tempered by mercy?’

Nash was given a two year prison sentence suspended for two years.

Judge Baumgartner described Nash’s case as ‘exceptional’ when justifying his decision to suspend the sentence. He said: ‘I do not shy away from saying that this was a very difficult case to judge…’

PC Longmate, also of Chesterfield, denied but was convicted of one charge of misconduct in relation to the incident in the patrol car with Nash on October 4, 2015.

He was bailed ahead of sentencing in January.

Former PC Daniel Nash pleaded guilty to 14 counts of misconduct in public office earlier this year. He died a month after sentencing (pictured in 2022)

Former PC Daniel Nash pleaded guilty to 14 counts of misconduct in public office earlier this year. He died a month after sentencing (pictured in 2022)

Former PC Daniel Nash pleaded guilty to 14 counts of misconduct in public office earlier this year. He died a month after sentencing (pictured in 2022)

Deputy Chief Constable Simon Blatchly said yesterday of Nash: ‘As members of the police service, we promise to protect our communities – in particular those who may be vulnerable to harm.

‘But instead of protecting them, Daniel Nash sought them out, and abused his position for his own sexual gain.

‘There is no place in policing for his kind and I, along with my colleagues, have been sickened to learn of his crimes.

‘When a report was first received relating to a complaint about Nash’s alleged conduct he was suspended from duty. He was then arrested, and an investigation took place.

‘During that investigation an initial victim led officers to 14 women in total that Nash had met through his work as a police officer. A number of these were victims of crimes such as domestic abuse – others had been perpetrators of crimes. All were vulnerable through various personal circumstances.

‘The investigation into Nash’s offending was directed by the Independent Office for Police Conduct. This investigation not only looked at Nash but the wider policing unit in which he was serving.

‘There was no evidence found that any of his colleagues, other than one other officer, knew, or suspected, of his offending.

‘The sentence that Nash received is a matter for the court, however, it is clear that had he not been in such serious ill health that he would have served a significant term in prison.

‘The crimes that Nash committed are among the most serious that can be imagined and, taken in the context of other recent incidents across the wider policing family, I understand the concern that this will cause.

‘But I want to be clear – if you know of any officer or staff member who is behaving in a manner that does not fit their role as a member of Derbyshire Constabulary, then I would urge you to contact the force, or, contact the independent charity CrimeStoppers, who can take anonymous reports in order for them to be investigated.

‘Someone like Nash has no place in policing and I, along with the staff and officers who are so appalled by his crimes, will do everything possible to find and remove anyone similar.’

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