Heart disease: ‘Evidence is clear’ – the popular drink to avoid to lower condition risk

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Heart disease: ‘Evidence is clear’ – the popular drink to avoid to lower condition risk

The heart is the pump that helps to keep the body functioning. It pumps blood, and the oxygen it carries, around the body to keep it functioning. Key

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The heart is the pump that helps to keep the body functioning. It pumps blood, and the oxygen it carries, around the body to keep it functioning. Key to a healthy heart are two factors, exercise and a balanced diet. As well as keeping fit, it is crucial to make sure what goes into the body can keep it running efficiently.

Some substances are worse for the heart than others and some food and drink, says the World Heart Federation (WHF), should be avoided or moderated.

So, what about alcohol?

The “evidence is clear,” says the WHF, that no amount of alcohol is safe.

No matter how little a person drinks, even a little dram can increase that person’s risk of developing heart disease.

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Drinking isn’t the only factor that affects one’s likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease, another umbrella term to describe conditions that affect the heart and blood vessels, there are others too.

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is one of the major factors.

“If your blood pressure is too high, it can damage your blood vessels,” says the NHS.

Furthermore, as with cancer, smoking can also increase the risk of developing forms of cardiovascular disease.

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This is due to the damage and narrowing that tobacco can inflict on the blood vessels.

Blood vessel narrowing can also occur if an individuals’ cholesterol is too high.

If that person has high levels of LDL, or ‘bad’, cholesterol this can lead to the buildup of plaque in the arteries around the heart, restricting blood flow.

Diabetics also run an increased risk of developing heart disease due to blood sugar levels becoming too high and damaging those same blood vessels already potentially dealing with the onslaught of smoking and plaque.

Some risk factors, however, are completely out of an individual’s control such as a family history of cardiovascular disease or their ethnic background.

In the UK at least, cardiovascular disease is more common in those of south Asian, African or Caribbean descent.

Age is another risk factor out of a person’s control in this regard with the risk of heart disease higher for those over the age of 50.

For more information on heart disease contact the NHS or consult with your GP.

Source: | This article first appeared on Express.co.uk

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