Ben Fogle relives journeys of Captain Scott, Sir Ernest Shackleton and Roald Amundsen

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Ben Fogle relives journeys of Captain Scott, Sir Ernest Shackleton and Roald Amundsen

Ben Fogle has relived the Antarctic journeys of Captain Robert Falcon Scott, Sir Ernest Shackleton and Roald Amundsen as part of a new series.The TV e

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Ben Fogle has relived the Antarctic journeys of Captain Robert Falcon Scott, Sir Ernest Shackleton and Roald Amundsen as part of a new series.

The TV explorer, 49, only had the types of Edwardian equipment, food supplies and shelter which the three adventurers used.

His journey to the South Pole, which began at the end of December, will be revealed in Endurance: Race To The Pole on Channel 5

On December 14 1911, Norwegian Amundsen became the first man to reach the South Pole – 35 days ahead of Scott. The bodies of Scott and his party were found 13 months after they disappeared on their mission.

Shackleton made several trips to Antarctica, first reaching within 400 miles of the South Pole in 1902, and he came even closer seven years later – just 97 miles from his goal – but had to turn back due to lack of food.

Ben Fogle will relive the Antarctic journeys of Captain Robert Falcon Scott, Sir Ernest Shackleton and Roald Amundsen as part of a new series. The TV explorer, 49, will have only the types of Edwardian equipment, food supplies and shelter which the three adventurers used as he documents his journey to the South Pole in Endurance: Race To The Pole on Channel 5. Above: Fogle in his traditional kit

Ben Fogle will relive the Antarctic journeys of Captain Robert Falcon Scott, Sir Ernest Shackleton and Roald Amundsen as part of a new series. The TV explorer, 49, will have only the types of Edwardian equipment, food supplies and shelter which the three adventurers used as he documents his journey to the South Pole in Endurance: Race To The Pole on Channel 5. Above: Fogle in his traditional kit

Ben Fogle will relive the Antarctic journeys of Captain Robert Falcon Scott, Sir Ernest Shackleton and Roald Amundsen as part of a new series. The TV explorer, 49, will have only the types of Edwardian equipment, food supplies and shelter which the three adventurers used as he documents his journey to the South Pole in Endurance: Race To The Pole on Channel 5. Above: Fogle in his traditional kit 

Shackleton made several trips to Antarctica, first reaching within 400 miles of the South Pole in 1902, and he came even closer seven years later - just 97 miles from his goal - but had to turn back due to lack of food. Above: File photo of Sir Ernest Shackleton on board the 'Quest'

Shackleton made several trips to Antarctica, first reaching within 400 miles of the South Pole in 1902, and he came even closer seven years later - just 97 miles from his goal - but had to turn back due to lack of food. Above: File photo of Sir Ernest Shackleton on board the 'Quest'

Shackleton made several trips to Antarctica, first reaching within 400 miles of the South Pole in 1902, and he came even closer seven years later – just 97 miles from his goal – but had to turn back due to lack of food. Above: File photo of Sir Ernest Shackleton on board the ‘Quest’

In 1915, after the success of Amundsen and Scott, Shackleton and his crew set out in the ship Endurance but were unable to reach land.

They became trapped in dense pack ice in the Weddell Sea, forcing the 28 men on board eventually to abandon ship.

They were stuck in the ice for around 10 months before escaping in lifeboats and on foot. 

The Endurance was crushed by the ice and sank. Last March, after decades of searches for the wreck, it was found at a depth of 9,868 feet (3,008 metres).

Remarkable footage showed how it had been astonishingly well-preserved, with the name ‘Endurance’ still visible on the vessel’s stern. 

Captain Scott had led what was officially called the British Antarctic Expedition 1910 but was better known as the Terra Nova expedition.

His five-man party also included Lawrence Oates, Edgar Evans, Edward Wilson and Henry Bowers. 

The team arrived at the South Pole on January 17, 1912 but found that Amundsen and his companions had gotten there first.

The Britons died during their return on the Ross Ice Shelf from a combination of exhaustion, starvation and extreme cold.  

Evans passed away on February 17, 1912 and Scott, Wilson and Bowers died in their tent around March 29.

Eight months later, a search party found the tent, the bodies and Scott’s diary.

In 1915, after the success of Amundsen and Scott, Shackleton and his crew set out in the ship Endurance but were unable to reach land. Pictured: a photograph of the vessel stuck in pack ice taken in the October of 1915, a few weeks before she sank

In 1915, after the success of Amundsen and Scott, Shackleton and his crew set out in the ship Endurance but were unable to reach land. Pictured: a photograph of the vessel stuck in pack ice taken in the October of 1915, a few weeks before she sank

In 1915, after the success of Amundsen and Scott, Shackleton and his crew set out in the ship Endurance but were unable to reach land. Pictured: a photograph of the vessel stuck in pack ice taken in the October of 1915, a few weeks before she sank

The members of Captain Scott's ill-fated expedition to the South Pole, (l to r) Laurence Oates, H.R. Bowers, Robert Scott, Edward Wilson and Edgar Evans. They reached the Pole a month after Roald Amundsen's Norwegian party, but all died on the return journey

The members of Captain Scott's ill-fated expedition to the South Pole, (l to r) Laurence Oates, H.R. Bowers, Robert Scott, Edward Wilson and Edgar Evans. They reached the Pole a month after Roald Amundsen's Norwegian party, but all died on the return journey

The members of Captain Scott’s ill-fated expedition to the South Pole, (l to r) Laurence Oates, H.R. Bowers, Robert Scott, Edward Wilson and Edgar Evans. They reached the Pole a month after Roald Amundsen’s Norwegian party, but all died on the return journey

Roald Amundsen (pictured in 1912), a Norwegian, got to the South Pole 35 days ahead of Scott's team

Roald Amundsen (pictured in 1912), a Norwegian, got to the South Pole 35 days ahead of Scott's team

Roald Amundsen (pictured in 1912), a Norwegian, got to the South Pole 35 days ahead of Scott’s team

Members of Scott's expedition are seen standing in front of a tent during their journey to the South Pole

Members of Scott's expedition are seen standing in front of a tent during their journey to the South Pole

Members of Scott’s expedition are seen standing in front of a tent during their journey to the South Pole

Three expedition members sit around a camping stove in the Ross Dependency of Antarctica, during Captain Robert Falcon Scott's Terra Nova Expedition to the Antarctic, February 7, 1911

Three expedition members sit around a camping stove in the Ross Dependency of Antarctica, during Captain Robert Falcon Scott's Terra Nova Expedition to the Antarctic, February 7, 1911

Three expedition members sit around a camping stove in the Ross Dependency of Antarctica, during Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s Terra Nova Expedition to the Antarctic, February 7, 1911

Carrying an expedition crew of 28 men, the 144-foot-long Endurance was a three-masted schooner barque sturdily built for operations in polar waters. Pictured: the Endurance, stuck in pack ice, listing heavily to port

Carrying an expedition crew of 28 men, the 144-foot-long Endurance was a three-masted schooner barque sturdily built for operations in polar waters. Pictured: the Endurance, stuck in pack ice, listing heavily to port

Carrying an expedition crew of 28 men, the 144-foot-long Endurance was a three-masted schooner barque sturdily built for operations in polar waters. Pictured: the Endurance, stuck in pack ice, listing heavily to port

Endurance is seen stuck in the ice in the Weddell Sea during Shackleton's voyage

Endurance is seen stuck in the ice in the Weddell Sea during Shackleton's voyage

Endurance is seen stuck in the ice in the Weddell Sea during Shackleton’s voyage 

The vessel became stuck in pack ice on the Weddell Sea on January 18, 1915 — where she and her crew would remain for many months. In late October, however, a drop in temperature from 42°F to -14°F saw the ice pack begin to steadily crush the Endurance — which finally sank on November 21, 1915. Pictured: Anglo-Irish sailor and explorer Frank Wild assessing the wreckage of the Endurance as it is crushed by tightening pack ice

The vessel became stuck in pack ice on the Weddell Sea on January 18, 1915 — where she and her crew would remain for many months. In late October, however, a drop in temperature from 42°F to -14°F saw the ice pack begin to steadily crush the Endurance — which finally sank on November 21, 1915. Pictured: Anglo-Irish sailor and explorer Frank Wild assessing the wreckage of the Endurance as it is crushed by tightening pack ice

The vessel became stuck in pack ice on the Weddell Sea on January 18, 1915 — where she and her crew would remain for many months. In late October, however, a drop in temperature from 42°F to -14°F saw the ice pack begin to steadily crush the Endurance — which finally sank on November 21, 1915. Pictured: Anglo-Irish sailor and explorer Frank Wild assessing the wreckage of the Endurance as it is crushed by tightening pack ice

Photo issued by Falklands Maritime Heritage Trust of the stern of the wreck of Endurance, Sir Ernest Shackleton's ship which had not been seen since it was crushed by the ice and sank in the Weddell Sea in 1915

Photo issued by Falklands Maritime Heritage Trust of the stern of the wreck of Endurance, Sir Ernest Shackleton's ship which had not been seen since it was crushed by the ice and sank in the Weddell Sea in 1915

Photo issued by Falklands Maritime Heritage Trust of the stern of the wreck of Endurance, Sir Ernest Shackleton’s ship which had not been seen since it was crushed by the ice and sank in the Weddell Sea in 1915

Fogle, who said in an Instagram post this morning that he has just returned from the ‘unforgettable’ trip, said: ‘This is a dream project for me. 

‘I have held a lifelong fascination with this period of heroic polar exploration and now I get the chance to experience immersive, living history myself by wearing the same clothes, eating the same type of food, pulling the same-style sled and sleeping in the same canvas tent.

‘This will give me a better understanding about the heroics and the sacrifices made by these brave men more than a hundred years ago in one of the harshest most unforgiving places on earth.

‘Having raced to the pole myself in 2008 wearing modern equipment, now I get to experience the harsh Antarctic wilderness as they did.’

In 2009, Fogle skied over 750km to the South Pole, and was beaten by a Norwegian team.

In the new three-part series, he will be accompanied by polar explorer Dwayne Fields as they take a look at Amundsen, Shackleton and Scott’s contrasting expeditions.

The new 60-minute episodes also see Fogle and polar explorer Dwayne Fields face some 'physical and psychological real-life' experiences of the three men

The new 60-minute episodes also see Fogle and polar explorer Dwayne Fields face some 'physical and psychological real-life' experiences of the three men

The new 60-minute episodes also see Fogle and polar explorer Dwayne Fields face some ‘physical and psychological real-life’ experiences of the three men

The 60-minute episodes also see the two modern explorers face some ‘physical and psychological real-life’ experiences of the three men.

By focusing on what the series calls the ‘character flaws, their bitter rivalries, and their fatal mistakes’ it will reveal why Amundsen triumphed, and why Shackleton and Scott failed.

On the new series, Denise Seneviratne, commissioning editor of non-scripted UK originals at Channel 5 and Paramount+, said: ‘We are thrilled to be continuing our relationship with Ben at Channel 5.

‘This ambitious adventure will really push him to his limits and open up our understanding of the real heroics behind polar exploration, past and present.

‘This series is immersive, experiential history which I think will really capture the imagination of our viewers.’

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