Coronavirus UK: Death toll hits 17,337 with 873 new fatalities

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Coronavirus UK: Death toll hits 17,337 with 873 new fatalities

The UK has today announced another 828 deaths from the coronavirus today, taking Britain's total number of victims to 17,337. Officials diagnosed

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The UK has today announced another 828 deaths from the coronavirus today, taking Britain’s total number of victims to 17,337. 

Officials diagnosed 4,301 more people with the virus in the past 24 hours, marking the lowest increase in confirmed cases in a fortnight, since April 7 when 3,634 people were diagnosed.

This rise in fatalities is the biggest increase since Saturday, April 18, (888) and almost double the number that was announced yesterday (449).

Although the rebound looks bad on a graph it doesn’t mean the outbreak is getting worse because the deaths are backdated – 43 of them actually happened in March, and 493 were spread across Saturday, Sunday and Monday.  

NHS data shows April 8 remains the deadliest day so far in the epidemic and, with today’s announcements added, the day believed to be the peak of the outbreak saw 815 hospital fatalities. 

But the true number of coronavirus victims in the UK may still be 41 per cent higher than daily Government and NHS statistics are letting on.

Weekly data published today by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) showed that at least 13,121 people had died in England and Wales by April 10. 

Department of Health statistics had, by that date, announced only 9,288 fatalities – the backdated deaths increased the total by 41.2 per cent. That suggests the death toll of 17,382 confirmed today could in reality be closer to 25,000.

And care homes in England and Wales had recorded the deaths of at least 1,644 residents by April 10 – 10 per cent of all the UK’s COVID-19 deaths. Today’s update is one of the first real official glimpses of the crisis gripping the care sector. 

Fifteen per cent of all people dying with COVID-19 were succumbing to their illness outside of hospitals, the stats showed, revealing the crisis cannot be managed solely by the NHS. 

And one in every three people (33.6 per cent) who died of any cause between April 4 and April 10 had coronavirus. 

That week, authorities recorded the most deaths for a single week in 20 years, with 18,516 people dying – 8,000 more than average. Around 6,200 of those were officially linked to the coronavirus, suggesting a further 1,800 were indirect ‘excess’ deaths or COVID-19 sufferers who never got tested.

The record number of fatalities coincides with what now appears to have been the peak of the UK’s COVID-19 outbreak on April 8, when NHS hospitals recorded 803 coronavirus patients dying. 

In other coronavirus news:

  • Government ministers are at loggerheads over what to do about moving out of lockdown, with Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Health Secretary Matt Hancock committed to stamping out the virus completely while Chancellor Rishi Sunak and Cabinet minister Michael Gove want to ease restrictions to save the economy;
  • Boris Johnson is slowly returning to official duties and spoke to US President Donald Trump on the phone today and has a scheduled audience with the Queen later this week;
  • The editor British medical journal, The Lancet, Dr Richard Horton, said the Government is attempting to ‘rewrite history’ as it deals with the coronavirus crisis and tries to justify past actions he views as errors;
  • Sweden has today recorded 185 deaths from the coronavirus – its highest one-day toll so far. The country has got itself a reputation for bucking the trend in Europe and refusing to go into lockdown;
  • The British Government’s furlough scheme has seen 185,000 businesses claim for £1.5billion to cover the wages of 1.3million employees – applications only opened yesterday.

The Office for National Statistics data, which reveals the true scale of coronavirus deaths, is now considerably higher than the Department of Health's daily updates

The Office for National Statistics data, which reveals the true scale of coronavirus deaths, is now considerably higher than the Department of Health's daily updates

The Office for National Statistics data, which reveals the true scale of coronavirus deaths, is now considerably higher than the Department of Health’s daily updates

Week 15 of this year (April 4 to April 10), when the coronavirus outbreak is believed to have peaked, was the deadliest week for more than 20 years in England and Wales, and more than a third of fatalities involved COVID-19

Week 15 of this year (April 4 to April 10), when the coronavirus outbreak is believed to have peaked, was the deadliest week for more than 20 years in England and Wales, and more than a third of fatalities involved COVID-19

Week 15 of this year (April 4 to April 10), when the coronavirus outbreak is believed to have peaked, was the deadliest week for more than 20 years in England and Wales, and more than a third of fatalities involved COVID-19

WEEK-ON-WEEK CARE HOME DEATHS DOUBLE IN A FORTNIGHT

The weekly number of care home deaths has doubled in a fortnight amid the coronavirus crisis, according to a shock report released today. 

ONS data shows 4,927 fatalities were recorded in homes across England and Wales in the week that ended April 10 – including 826 that involved COVID-19.

This has almost doubled from the 2,489 care home deaths that were recorded in the week that ended March 27, the week when the draconian lockdown begun.

It means the official care home death toll – registered up until April 10 – in England and Wales stands at 1,043. But the true figure is likely to be much higher. 

Industry figures fear the true number is closer to 4,000 because fatalities are being hugely under-reported due to a lack of testing. Only people in hospitals are routinely tested for the disease.

GPs are also sometimes reluctant to write COVID-19 on death certificates and figures from care homes are not included in the official daily toll, care bosses say.

ONS data published today also showed the number of care home deaths that occurred up until April 10 that were registered by April 18 was 1,458 in England alone.

But the ONS weekly data release is the only measure given to the public about how many people are dying outside of hospitals. Hospital statistics are released and updated every day. 

Salford has so far had the highest number of COVID-19 fatalities in care homes with 46, followed by County Durham, Ealing and Southwark (26 each).

Liz Kendall, Labour’s shadow minister for social care, said today: ‘These awful figures are only scratching the surface of the emerging crisis in social care because they are already 11 days out of date.’

‘This shows the terrible toll that coronavirus is having on elderly and disabled people in care homes,’ said Liz Kendall, the Labour Party’s shadow minister for social care.

‘Yet these awful figures are only scratching the surface of the emerging crisis in social care,’ she added, ‘because they are already 11 days out of date.

‘The Government must now publish daily figures of COVID-19 deaths outside hospital, including in care homes, so we know the true scale of the problem. 

‘This is essential to tackling the spread of the virus, ensuing social care has the resources it needs and getting vital PPE and testing to care workers on the frontline.’

Deaths that happened in care homes before April 11, and were officially reported by April 18, added up to 1,644, the ONS statistics showed.

And the organisation also revealed 466 people had died at home with the coronavirus, 87 had passed away in hospices, 21 in ‘other communal establishments’ and 45 elsewhere in the community.

The ONS data counts anybody who had COVID-19 mentioned on their death certificate, whether it was the main cause of death or not. 

Statistician for the ONS, Sarah Caul, said in a blog post: ‘The figures published on GOV.UK are valuable because they are available very quickly, and give an indication of what is happening day by day…

‘But they won’t necessarily include all deaths involving COVID-19, such as those not in a hospital.’

Ms Caul said the ONS figures, although slow to prepare, are ‘the most accurate and complete information’. 

Today’s statistics showed that the coronavirus crisis has sent the number of people dying in England and Wales soaring.

The week between April 4 and April 10 recorded the most deaths in 20 years – since January 2000 – with 18,516 people dying.

This was a surge of 7,996 on the national average, and at least 6,213 of those people had COVID-19 mentioned on their death certificate.

That means there were 1,783 ‘excess’ deaths which may have been an indirect result of the outbreak, such as people avoiding going to hospital or not getting the medical help they needed because the NHS is so busy.  

The vast majority of coronavirus deaths are happening in hospitals, but today's data suggests one in every 10 of them happens in a nursing home

The vast majority of coronavirus deaths are happening in hospitals, but today's data suggests one in every 10 of them happens in a nursing home

ONS data shows that more people aged between 75 and 84 are dying of the coronavirus than any other age group. The NHS data shows hospital deaths are more common among over-85s

ONS data shows that more people aged between 75 and 84 are dying of the coronavirus than any other age group. The NHS data shows hospital deaths are more common among over-85s

The vast majority of coronavirus deaths are happening in hospitals, but today’s data suggests one in every 10 of them happens in a nursing home. ONS figures have also made clear that people aged between 75 and 84 are dying in the biggest numbers, while NHS data suggested it was over-85s

London is still the region with the most deaths caused by coronavirus - 1,506 people there have died with the virus (24.3 per cent of all deaths in England and Wales)

London is still the region with the most deaths caused by coronavirus - 1,506 people there have died with the virus (24.3 per cent of all deaths in England and Wales)

The number of people who have died so far this year in England and Wales (184,950) is significantly higher than average (174,718) because of the COVID-19 outbreak

The number of people who have died so far this year in England and Wales (184,950) is significantly higher than average (174,718) because of the COVID-19 outbreak

London is still the region with the most deaths caused by coronavirus – 1,506 people there have died with the virus (24.3 per cent of all deaths in England and Wales). England and Wales as a whole has recorded significantly more deaths than average so far this year

THIRD OF ALL FATALITIES IN BRITAIN’S DEADLIEST WEEK IN TWO DECADES WERE LINKED TO COVID-19, STATISTICS SHOW

One in every three people who died between April 4 and April 10 had the coronavirus mentioned on their death certificate, data revealed today.

Records from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) showed that 6,213 deaths out of a total 18,516 in that week were linked to COVID-19.

This was a rate of 33.6 per cent, marking a huge rise on the 21.2 per cent in the week before, when almost half as many deaths (3,475) were tied to the disease.

Not all of the deaths will be as a direct result of COVID-19. For instance, scores of victims who tested positive will have died from other causes. 

Grim statistics released by the ONS also revealed that same week – known as Week 15 – was the deadliest in at least two decades.

Statisticians said there was 2,129 more deaths registered during the seven-day spell than the week before, which ended April 3.

And the weekly death toll was also around 8,000 higher than the five-year average. The ONS said: ‘[It] is the highest weekly total since Week 1 in 2000.’

As well as people dying as a direct result of catching the virus and falling ill with it, people are also believed to be becoming indirect victims of the epidemic.

A&E attendances for all conditions, and notably heart attacks, have plummeted since the outbreak started because people are afraid of catching the virus in hospital or burdening the NHS.

And others may face treatment delays or cancellations – all non-urgent operations have been cancelled, and some cancer therapies delayed – which risks putting their health at risk.

Professor Keith Neal, a disease expert at the University of Nottingham, said: ‘These latest figures from the ONS show that over 6,000 of the 8,000 excess deaths reported in the week up to 10th April 2020 were COVID-19 related. 

‘We know deaths are occurring outside hospitals and this is the best way we have in determining this.’

This week, the deadliest for two decades, coincides with what scientists now believe was the peak of the UK’s coronavirus epidemic – April 8. 

NHS statistics show that, in hospitals in England, 803 people died of COVID-19 on Wednesday, April 8, and no day before or since has recorded more fatalities.

Scientists now believe this was the peak of Britain’s devastating outbreak, which is one of the worst in the world with more than 125,000 people being diagnosed with the disease and at least 16,000 dying of it. 

Professor David Paton, an economist at Nottingham University, said in a Twitter thread last week: ‘Of course it is possible that there will be another surge and another higher peak later on but recent declines in hospitalisations make that unlikely in the near future.’ 

One medical expert and editor of British medical journal, The Lancet, Dr Richard Horton, has accused the Government of ‘deliberately rewriting history’ with the way it has handled the coronavirus outbreak.

Dr Horton slammed the Government for trying to spending time trying to defend its lack of action while the coronavirus spiralled out of control in the UK.

He said: ‘The fact is that minsters/scientific advisers failed to understand what was happening in China, despite evidence.’

His damning comments, posted on Twitter, come after he was dragged into a row between Downing Street and the media on Sunday evening.

Downing Street refuted that there was ‘scientific consensus’ that a pandemic was imminent, nodding to tweets from Dr Horton in January which urged caution about calling it a ‘killer virus’.

Dr Horton furiously rejected claims that he played down the threat of the virus, and instead said he had sounded the alarm on multiple occasions.

MPs returned to work at the House of Commons today. Many of them will take part in Parliament via video link in a bid to maintain social distancing

MPs returned to work at the House of Commons today. Many of them will take part in Parliament via video link in a bid to maintain social distancing

Paramecics are pictured working at St Thomas' Hospital in central London

Paramecics are pictured working at St Thomas' Hospital in central London

MPs returned to work at the House of Commons today. Many of them will take part in Parliament via video link in a bid to maintain social distancing. Pictured right, paramedics at work in London

ALMOST 90% OF PEOPLE WHO DIE FROM COVID-19 ARE OVER 65, REPORT REVEALS 

Almost 90 per cent of people who die from coronavirus in England and Wales are over the age of 65, the report revealed today.

Separate figures compiled by the ONS showed 10,808 of the 12,380 COVID-19 deaths that occurred up until April 10 were among over-65s.

It is unclear why the overall number of deaths figure is slightly different to the overall number given in the main report by the ONS. 

The data also revealed 23 people under the age of 29 had died after testing positive for the killer virus up until April 10, compared to 334 people in their fifties.

And men made up the largest proportion of COVID-19 deaths, representing 60 per cent (7,524) of the total.

AGE RANGE 

<1

1-4

5-9

10-14

15-19

20-24

25-29

30-34

35-39

40-44

45-49

50-54

55-59

60-64

65-69

70-74

75-79

80-84

85-89

90+

OVERALL

DEATHS

0

0

0

0

5

8

15

22

39

56

141

243

424

619

827

1,348

1,911

2,428

2,275

2,019

12,380

MEN 

0

0

0

0

2

4

8

13

24

33

79

150

279

415

546

893

1,240

1,525

1,346

967 

7,524 

WOMEN

0

0

0

0

3

4

7

9

15

23

62

93

145

204

281

455

671

903

929

1,052

4,856 

Number 10 is in internal turmoil as well as facing up to criticism coming from outside. Ministers are divided now on how and when to move the country out of its current lockdown.

Tough restrictions could stay in place for the rest of this year, some insiders have warned, amid claims Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s personal battle with the disease has made him ‘tentative’ about lifting lockdown.

Tories have suggested the PM is ‘frightened’ of taking chances with the deadly virus after his own close call, despite fears the economic havoc might prove even more damaging to public health.

The pressure is intensifying on ministers to plot a way out of the crisis, but divisions have emerged between cautious ‘doves’ and bullish ‘hawks’ who believe the NHS has capacity to cope and would prefer to loosen the draconian social distancing measures earlier.

The PM has intervened from his recuperation at Chequers to snuff out speculation about an imminent easing, with Downing Street making clear his priority is avoiding a ‘second peak’ in the outbreak.

There are reports Mr Johnson’s close circle has stopped using the phrase ‘exit strategy’ and instead wants to signal a ‘next phase’ of lockdown, with varying levels of restrictions set to continue for the rest of the year until the virus gets ‘close to eradication’ or a vaccine is found.

The ‘doves’ have been supported by grim behind-the-scenes warnings from scientists, who have advised that control of the outbreak is still so uncertain that even slight changes to the curbs on normal life could result in a disastrous flare-up.

There is no prospect of lockdown measures being eased before the current period comes to an end on May 11.

However, some senior Tories have been pushing plans for an easing soon afterwards, pointing out that the NHS is still below surge capacity and could ‘run hot’ to limit the economic meltdown.

Before his illness there were rumours Mr Johnson was alarmed about the devastation being wrought on UK plc.

However, the premier, who was released from hospital a week ago, is now seen as aligned with the Cabinet ‘doves’ cautious about shifting too early.

According to the Times, Mr Johnson is thought to be leaning towards ‘a longer lockdown that aims to drive the virus close to eradication, allowing occasional flare-ups to be isolated and shut down through testing and contact tracing’.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock, who also contracted coronavirus, is also urging a safety-first approach, regarding a second wave of the virus as more dangerous than the impact of lockdown.

ENGLAND’S CORONAVIRUS DEATHS PEAKED ON APRIL 8, NHS FIGURES SHOW 

DATE 

Apr 1

Apr 2

Apr 3

Apr 4

Apr 5

Apr 6

Apr 7

Apr 8

Apr 9

Apr 10

Apr 11

Apr 12

Apr 13

Apr 14

Apr 15

Apr 16

Apr 17

Apr 18

Apr 19

Apr 20

DEATHS

567 

579 

623 

715 

683 

669 

742 

815 

711 

677 

712 

651 

622 

590 

619

579 

516 

449 

320 

136 

Data is backdated from NHS England statistics. Because of the time it takes for deaths to be reported, the last five days, to April 16, are likely to change significantly before the total is reached. The earlier dates are likely to change but to a lesser extent. 

Chancellor Rishi Sunak, Trade Secretary Liz Truss, and Cabinet Office minister Michael Gove are thought to be more hawkish about the need to ease restrictions sooner – although they have been toeing the line in public.

Downing Street has been furiously playing down hints that schools could partly reopen in the middle of next month, with June now looking the earliest timetable.

Government scientists have been warning that the situation is currently so finely balanced that even marginal loosenings could have disastrous effects,

One Cabinet source told the Guardian the government’s advisers on Sage had suggested any easing would push up the rate of transmission – known as R-naught, representing the number of people an average patient infects.

The source said: ‘The scientists are very clear. There’s no loosening of measures we can do that won’t bring the R back over 1.

‘There may be some small changes on their own that could do it, but the question is whether behaviours change in other ways and push the R above 1. The second you have the R above one then you’re back to exponential growth.

‘We did have an R of about 3. And we’ve driven that down. But even a small increase in transmission could put you above 1.’

As the Government grapples with how to move forward, Mr Johnson remains off work in recuperation at Chequers, the Prime Minister’s country home, but in a gradual resumption of his duties he spoke to Donald Trump today and will hold his regular audience with the Queen this week.

A Downing Street spokesperson said: ‘The Prime Minister spoke to President Trump this afternoon, and thanked him for his good wishes while he was unwell.

‘The leaders agreed on the importance of a coordinated international response to coronavirus, including through the G7 – which the US currently chairs.

‘They also discussed continued UK-US cooperation in the fight against the pandemic.

‘The leaders committed to continue working together to strengthen our bilateral relationship, including by signing a free trade agreement as soon as possible.’

The PM has been recovering from his coronavirus scare – which saw him spend three nights in intensive care – at Chequers along with pregnant fiancee Carrie Symonds. 

Mr Johnson will also speak to the monarch by phone later in the week – although his deputy Dominic Raab, usually the Foreign Secretary will take Prime Minister’s Questions in the Commons tomorrow and chair a Cabinet meeting on Thursday. 

WHERE HAVE THE UK’S CORONAVIRUS PATIENTS DIED? ONS DATA RANKED BY THE NUMBER OF CARE HOME DEATHS
LOCAL AUTHORITYHOMEHOSPITALCARE HOMEHOSPICEOTHERELSEWHERE
Salford08446000
County Durham210327000
Ealing711327701
Southwark89327000
Birmingham11369266016
Vale of White Horse21924000
Wiltshire55722000
Milton Keynes24920200
Reigate and Banstead14220000
Sheffield16820020
Liverpool1116319101
Barnet1418019100
Hammersmith and Fulham85119100
Newham1111519003
Cheshire East46718200
Enfield1311318001
Newcastle upon Tyne13917100
Warrington02116000
Croydon516116000
Bristol, City of23515200
Stockport37015000
Bromley39115000
Islington44915000
South Gloucestershire23314000
Wokingham31813100
Rotherham23513000
Coventry47813201
Leeds79713400
Hertsmere35312001
Oldham54912001
Wirral29012000
Wandsworth58012130
Derby46911101
Cheltenham11411200
Sefton26911000
Brent1020011100
Lambeth411011400
Shropshire32610000
South Lakeland64510100
Mid Sussex02310000
Manchester48110100
Dudley410010001
Wolverhampton510710201
Havering210210000
Westminster57710000
Bath and North East Somerset0219000
Swindon1209000
Chiltern2299000
North East Derbyshire5149100
East Northamptonshire0159100
East Hertfordshire3189100
Bolton1469101
Sunderland2789100
Bradford10589200
Wakefield2709200
Kensington and Chelsea7469200
Cornwall5458000
Charnwood2178000
Harrogate0188020
Cherwell1178000
Hillingdon61068110
Merton9618000
Middlesbrough1477000
West Berkshire3237000
Windsor and Maidenhead2297000
Cheshire West and Chester4577000
Gloucester6187000
Maidstone2147000
Chichester1117000
Bromsgrove0237002
Welwyn Hatfield1287100
Tameside5537011
Hackney10857100
Sutton1557101
Tower Hamlets11737001
Leicester0486001
Reading2206100
Eastbourne0116000
Dacorum2316000
North West Leicestershire0186000
Scarborough076000
West Oxfordshire0186000
Rochdale5556000
Gateshead1506000
Barking and Dagenham7736000
Harrow141486101
Stoke-on-Trent1205001
Brighton and Hove1275000
Dorset1335110
Aylesbury Vale0175110
Wycombe1265000
Melton075000
South Oxfordshire0155000
Newcastle-under-Lyme0205000
Mole Valley0285000
Spelthorne2175000
Rugby095000
Sandwell41055001
Solihull4585200
Kingston upon Thames2285000
Richmond upon Thames3415100
Hartlepool1144000
Stockton-on-Tees3194000
East Riding of Yorkshire4234001
Southampton1324000
Erewash0204110
Lewes0154000
Epping Forest0564000
Fareham1314001
Gosport0174000
Havant0244000
New Forest0164100
Watford2214000
Canterbury1104101
Thanet1154000
Harborough084000
North Kesteven0114100
Northampton3344011
Craven3104100
Gedling1224000
Lichfield2274100
South Staffordshire1294000
Mid Suffolk0124000
Elmbridge2254020
Guildford0114000
Waverley0144100
St Albans0234000
Bury2414001
Trafford0344000
Barnsley5424100
North Tyneside1224000
Walsall31064100
Kirklees8584000
Camden4544100
Greenwich1984000
Haringey101154001
Lewisham91244001
Halton1193000
Kingston upon Hull, City of2133000
York4173000
Nottingham2363000
North Somerset3113000
Northumberland3473010
Amber Valley0243100
Exeter193000
Basingstoke and Deane0303000
East Hampshire0113000
Eastleigh193000
Fylde0113000
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk0283000
Ashfield2273100
Rushcliffe1123000
Oxford3123020
South Somerset043000
Cannock Chase0253000
East Staffordshire2303000
Staffordshire Moorlands1123000
Ipswich1203000
Woking073000
North Warwickshire0123000
Nuneaton and Bedworth2353000
Horsham1173001
Wyre Forest2273000
East Suffolk3383000
Wigan1433000
Calderdale1293000
Bexley2783000
Redcar and Cleveland1222001
Darlington0112000
Portsmouth0332000
Bedford1212000
Central Bedfordshire4502000
Barrow-in-Furness1242000
Copeland4122000
High Peak1142000
East Devon052000
North Devon032000
Colchester0182010
Tewkesbury1122000
Winchester0162000
Three Rivers0162000
Sevenoaks0232000
Folkestone and Hythe0102010
Swale2232000
Tunbridge Wells152000
Burnley0172000
Pendle1142100
Preston3192000
West Lancashire1242000
Oadby and Wigston0122000
South Kesteven082000
Breckland082000
Kettering0132000
Newark and Sherwood0192000
Epsom and Ewell1232100
Runnymede1172000
Tandridge0182000
Malvern Hills0102000
Wychavon2192100
Doncaster4262000
South Tyneside0262000
Hounslow4802301
Herefordshire, County of0151200
Telford and Wrekin2141010
Plymouth0141000
Torbay2121000
Southend-on-Sea2541010
Thurrock1331000
South Bucks0211000
Cambridge091000
East Cambridgeshire161000
Huntingdonshire0121000
Carlisle2251010
Eden0131000
Bolsover081000
Chesterfield2131000
Derbyshire Dales0131000
South Derbyshire0201000
Torridge011000
West Devon121000
Braintree1221000
Brentwood0221000
Cotswold0111010
North Hertfordshire0171100
Ashford1111010
Dartford1201000
Gravesham0211000
Tonbridge and Malling0121000
Lancaster0211200
Ribble Valley051000
South Ribble2121000
Hinckley and Bosworth1161000
Boston091000
South Norfolk081000
Wellingborough081000
Hambleton0171000
Selby151000
Mansfield0251220
Stafford1181000
Babergh091000
Surrey Heath081000
Stratford-on-Avon1221110
Warwick1231000
Crawley0181000
Redditch1131000
St. Helens3301000
Redbridge81091001
Waltham Forest8961002
Blackburn with Darwen1160000
Blackpool1150100
North East Lincolnshire0130000
North Lincolnshire060000
Rutland020000
Peterborough0140000
Luton3670000
Medway1520000
Bracknell Forest1160000
Slough3330101
Isle of Wight170000
Isles of Scilly000000
Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole2280100
Fenland0130000
South Cambridgeshire190000
Allerdale3210000
Mid Devon130000
South Hams040000
Teignbridge0110000
Hastings030000
Rother060100
Wealden0210000
Basildon0540000
Castle Point2210000
Chelmsford1370000
Harlow1270000
Maldon0110000
Rochford0200000
Tendring0260101
Uttlesford0150000
Forest of Dean1140000
Stroud1160100
Hart0140100
Rushmoor0100100
Test Valley0110000
Broxbourne2250200
Dover1170000
Chorley0170000
Hyndburn280100
Rossendale140000
Wyre190000
Blaby0130000
East Lindsey190000
Lincoln140000
South Holland0110000
West Lindsey040000
Broadland0100100
Great Yarmouth0140000
North Norfolk0120000
Norwich010000
Corby080000
Daventry0130000
South Northamptonshire0120000
Richmondshire160000
Ryedale150000
Bassetlaw080000
Broxtowe0220000
Mendip060000
Sedgemoor080000
Tamworth0180100
Adur020100
Arun0110000
Worthing070000
Worcester090110
Stevenage040000
West Suffolk190000
Somerset West and Taunton060010
Knowsley1220000
City of London030000

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