Britons feel least valued in their late 50s – but their self-worth recovers as they get older

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Britons feel least valued in their late 50s – but their self-worth recovers as they get older

Britons feel least valued in their late 50s but their self-worth rises again when they reach 70, a survey shows.Thirty-nine per cent in their late 50s

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Britons feel least valued in their late 50s but their self-worth rises again when they reach 70, a survey shows.

Thirty-nine per cent in their late 50s say they feel insignificant – more than in any other age group.

But for those in their 70s, that figure drops to just 15 per cent.

One in three in their late 50s say a feeling of being sidelined at work drains confidence. Slightly more say their declining social life is a factor. A dawning that dreams may never be fulfilled depresses 30 per cent.

But life feels better as people pass retirement age, the study for Sanctuary Care Homes shows.

Britons feel least valued in their late 50s but their self-worth rises again when they reach 70, a survey shows (file image)

Britons feel least valued in their late 50s but their self-worth rises again when they reach 70, a survey shows (file image)

Britons feel least valued in their late 50s but their self-worth rises again when they reach 70, a survey shows (file image)

Those in their twenties were found to feel most confident of their value. One in three said a feeling of being sidelined at work had resulted in lost confidence in their own worth.

A slightly larger proportion – 35 per cent compared to 34 per cent – said a factor was a decline in their social life.

A dawning that their dreams may never be fulfilled was cited by 30 per cent.

Meanwhile, 27 per cent said declining physical health was a contributing factor, and one in five were affected by a feeling they could not influence politics as much as when they were younger.

After the years of declining self-worth that begin in our thirties, there was a resurgent upturn among people as they approach and pass retirement.

One person who put their new-found sense of significance down to post-retirement said: ‘As I got older, I became wiser and less concerned about others.

‘I took on voluntary duties where I make a difference. I also took up bowling.

‘It wasn’t the bowling that made me feel significant again but meeting new people and learning a new skill.’

A concerning 39 per cent of people in their late 50s reported feeling insignificant - a larger proportion than in any other age group. But for those in their 70s the figure drops to just 15 per cent, the research found (file image)

A concerning 39 per cent of people in their late 50s reported feeling insignificant - a larger proportion than in any other age group. But for those in their 70s the figure drops to just 15 per cent, the research found (file image)

A concerning 39 per cent of people in their late 50s reported feeling insignificant – a larger proportion than in any other age group. But for those in their 70s the figure drops to just 15 per cent, the research found (file image)

Many felt they developed a closer bond with their family after their fifties.

Sarah Clarke-Kuehn, of Sanctuary Care, said: ‘We know from academic research that significance is one of six key senses that people need to feel their lives are enriched and fulfilled, along with a sense of security, belonging, continuity, purpose, and achievement.

‘The findings reinforce the importance of self-worth.’

Health experts have found those who feel they don’t matter can have lower serotonin levels, which can impact mood and anxiety.

Levels of self-worth can also have a physical health impact, but 42 per cent of those surveyed were not aware of the potential non-mental influence on their wellbeing.

Source: | This article originally belongs to Dailymail.co.uk

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