King Charles last night condemned the ‘barbaric acts of terrorism’ inflicted on Israel.

The monarch was backed by the Prince and Princess of Wales, who said they were ‘profoundly distressed’ at the unfolding civilian slaughter, adding: ‘The horrors inflicted by Hamas’s terrorist attack upon Israel are appalling.’

William and Kate went even further, highlighting the country’s ‘right of self-defence’. The royals’ deliberate use of the word ‘terrorism’ to describe the atrocities came in sharp contrast to the BBC, which refuses to call Hamas a ‘terrorist’ organisation.

It refers to Hamas as a ‘militant’ group and described the slaughter of civilians as a ‘militant’ attack.

Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis accused broadcasters of trying to ‘wilfully mislead’ by not using the word terrorist, saying: ‘The murder of babies where they sleep is not the act of a “freedom fighter”.’

The King last night unequivocally condemned the ‘barbaric acts of terrorism’ inflicted on Israel.

The King last night unequivocally condemned the ‘barbaric acts of terrorism’ inflicted on Israel.

William and Kate were described as being "profoundly distressed" at the "devastating" events. The senior royals offered their thoughts and prayers to all those suffering, with the King doing so personally in a telephone call to President Isaac Herzog on Wednesday afternoon.

William and Kate were described as being “profoundly distressed” at the “devastating” events. The senior royals offered their thoughts and prayers to all those suffering, with the King doing so personally in a telephone call to President Isaac Herzog on Wednesday afternoon.

The royal intervention was the latest show of support for Israel from the UK and came as Hamas launched a fresh wave of rocket attacks, destroying a children’s hospital and a supermarket.

Gaza was last night set to be plunged into darkness after its power plant ran out of fuel following Israel’s ‘siege’ and ongoing air strikes in retaliation for Saturday’s attacks, which killed more than 1,200 Israelis in acts of incomprehensible savagery.

A string of high-profile figures, including Defence Secretary Grant Shapps and Labour leader Keir Starmer, yesterday heaped pressure on the BBC over its approach to covering the murder of Israeli civilians. Mr Shapps told LBC that it was ‘verging on disgraceful’, adding: ‘It’s time to get the moral compass out at the BBC.’

BBC editorial guidelines say terrorism is an ‘emotive subject with significant political overtones’ and ‘terrorist’ can be a ‘barrier rather than an aid to understanding’.

Yesterday the King spoke to Israel president Isaac Herzog and King Abdullah of Jordan, whose country shares a border with the West Bank and who has endeavoured to promote dialogue in the region.

It is understood that the monarch – who acts on the advice of government – expressed his deep concern over the situation in the Middle East, as well as his thoughts and prayers for ‘all of those suffering’.

Charles has worked throughout his life to encourage inter-faith dialogue both nationally and on a global scale. An aide said he would continue to ‘seek ways to do so in such deeply painful times’.

A spokesman for William and Kate said: ‘The Prince and Princess of Wales are profoundly distressed by the devastating events that have unfolded in the past days. The horrors inflicted by Hamas’s terrorist attack upon Israel are appalling; they utterly condemn them.

‘As Israel exercises its right of self-defence, all Israelis and Palestinians will continue to be stalked by grief, fear and anger in the time to come.’

In 2018, William became the first royal to make an official visit to Israel and the Palestinian territories in 70 years, meeting the presidents of both countries and telling them: ‘Never has hope and reconciliation been more needed.’ Despite a growing backlash, it is understood the BBC is not planning to review or change its guidelines over the use of the words ‘terrorism’ and ‘terrorist’.

Veteran BBC foreign correspondent John Simpson defended the coverage claiming 'calling someone a terrorist means you're taking sides'

Veteran BBC foreign correspondent John Simpson defended the coverage claiming ‘calling someone a terrorist means you’re taking sides’

Last night Mr Simpson took to X, formerly known as Twitter , to defend his employers decision

Last night Mr Simpson took to X, formerly known as Twitter , to defend his employers decision

And last night it rejected criticism over its decision, despite Hamas being listed as a proscribed organisation, which means the UK Government sees it as a terrorist group.

BBC director of editorial policy David Jordan said not using the word terrorist was a ‘very long-standing policy’ which had ‘stood the test of time’. He added: ‘We’ve called them massacres, we’ve called [them] murders, we’ve called them out for what things are and that doesn’t in any way devalue the awfulness of what is going on.’

Nick Robinson, a presenter on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, said on social media: ‘I understand entirely why some want the word “terrorism” used. It is, though, the long-standing practice of BBC, ITV and Sky to report others using that language rather than using it ourselves.’

Culture Secretary Lucy Frazer has raised the issue with BBC director-general Tim Davie and made clear her view that these were ‘acts of terror carried out by a terrorist organisation’.

The Board of Deputies of British Jews said that by calling Hamas ‘militants’, the BBC ‘not only offers legitimacy to their government, but also denies the fact that they commit atrocities’.

Former BBC journalist Jon Sopel said the corporation’s editorial guidelines were ‘no longer fit for purpose’.

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak blasted the BBC for refusing to call the Hamas terrorists before attending Finchley United Synagogue in central London for victims and hostages of Hamas attacks on Monday

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak blasted the BBC for refusing to call the Hamas terrorists before attending Finchley United Synagogue in central London for victims and hostages of Hamas attacks on Monday 

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer urged the broadcaster to 'explain' why it calls Hamas, who became classified as a terrorist group in the UK in 2021, a militant group

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer urged the broadcaster to ‘explain’ why it calls Hamas, who became classified as a terrorist group in the UK in 2021, a militant group

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