Sarah Beeny pays tribute to inspirational female surgeons on International Women’s Day

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Sarah Beeny pays tribute to inspirational female surgeons on International Women’s Day

Sarah Beeny paid tribute to inspirational female surgeons on International Women's Day as she continues to battle breast cancer. The present

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Sarah Beeny paid tribute to inspirational female surgeons on International Women’s Day as she continues to battle breast cancer

The presenter and property expert, 51, shared a picture of herself standing in front of some photographs of the medical experts along with a special post. 

She wrote; ‘I filmed at the Royal College of Surgeons recently and felt so humbled by this incredible set of portraits. 

‘These inspirational women have all made huge contributions to surgical practice and are an utter inspiration! 

‘Thank you Clare Marx DBL DL, Linda de Cossart CBE, Anne Moore OBE, Leela Kabila OBE, Phyllis George, Valerie Lund CBE, Averil Mansfield CBE. #internationalwomensday #iwd2023 @royalcollegeofsurgeons.’

Sarah Beeny paid tribute to inspirational female surgeons on International Women's Day on Instagram as she continued to battle breast cancer

Sarah Beeny paid tribute to inspirational female surgeons on International Women's Day on Instagram as she continued to battle breast cancer

Sarah Beeny paid tribute to inspirational female surgeons on International Women’s Day on Instagram as she continued to battle breast cancer

She penned: 'These inspirational women have all made huge contributions to surgical practice and are an utter inspiration!'

She penned: 'These inspirational women have all made huge contributions to surgical practice and are an utter inspiration!'

She penned: ‘These inspirational women have all made huge contributions to surgical practice and are an utter inspiration!’

The post comes after Sarah honoured a brain tumour research charity on Wednesday evening as she lit a candle with her son. 

Sarah was diagnosed with breast cancer in August last year and lost her mother to the disease when she was was ten years old.

She began chemotherapy treatment last year but recently revealed her last session was cancelled after her white blood cell count was too low and her liver levels were too high.  

Sharing the clip to Instagram, she wrote: #shinealight for @braintumourrsch thanks for the amazing work you do!! Xx ps @nickyjohnston stunning candle you made, thanks so much Xx’

Sarah could be seen alongside her son in a faintly lit room with a candle in the middle of the table.

She said in the video: ‘We’re lighting a candle for Brain Tumour Research.’ 

Sarah then instructs her son to light the candle, with a blow torch. 

Jokingly, she adds after, ‘perhaps we should use a match next time.’

Tribute: Earlier this week, Sarah honoured a brain tumour research charity on Wednesday evening as she lit a candle with her son

Tribute: Earlier this week, Sarah honoured a brain tumour research charity on Wednesday evening as she lit a candle with her son

Tribute: Earlier this week, Sarah honoured a brain tumour research charity on Wednesday evening as she lit a candle with her son

Sarah was recently pictured in hospital getting further treatment for her breast cancer, and received special ‘tattoos’ as part of the procedure. 

She was given treatment at both the Royal Marsden and Yeovil hospitals – and posed for the camera as she showed off some of the markings she was given before receiving her latest procedure.

The mother-of-four who had to shave her hair last year after clumps fell out when she began therapy, jokingly scowled as she pointed to her new ink markings on her breasts ahead of treatment.

Her sons proudly posted a picture of their brave mum on their Instagram and joked that she now had some new tattoos.

Posting on their page for their indie band The Entitled Sons, they wrote: ‘Mum finally got some tattoos!

Treatment: The presenter and property expert, 51, was diagnosed with breast cancer in August last year and lost her mother to the disease when she was was ten years old

Treatment: The presenter and property expert, 51, was diagnosed with breast cancer in August last year and lost her mother to the disease when she was was ten years old

Treatment: The presenter and property expert, 51, was diagnosed with breast cancer in August last year and lost her mother to the disease when she was was ten years old

Shining a light: Sarah could be seen alongside her son in a faintly lit room with a candle in the middle of the table

Shining a light: Sarah could be seen alongside her son in a faintly lit room with a candle in the middle of the table

Shining a light: Sarah can be seen alongside her son in a faintly lit room with a candle in the middle of the table

Shining a light: Sarah can be seen alongside her son in a faintly lit room with a candle in the middle of the table

Shining a light: Sarah could be seen alongside her son in a faintly lit room with a candle in the middle of the table

‘Thank you so much to @royalmarsdennhs and @yeovil_hospital_nhs for taking such amazingly brilliant care of her. #tatoo #mum.’

Followers sent their well wishes with one saying: ‘Sending love and healing to your mum and to you lovely boys. Your mum is bloody amazing.’

Another added: ‘Sending love to you all. Remember having similar tattoos myself.’

A third asked: ‘Are you having radiation Sarah??’

And a fourth added: ‘Sending big hugs and love to you all – go Sarah kick cancer’s butt you’ve got this you’re in the best hospital in the U.K. for this – they did remarkable things for a friend of mine who had seven tumours on the brain. He survived!! @royalmarsden.’

Sarah revealed recently she would undergo radiation and a mastectomy this year.

She has been keeping fans up to date via Instagram as she continues to work from home amid her battle with breast cancer. 

Tough: Sarah began chemotherapy treatment last year but recently revealed her last session was cancelled after her white blood cell count was too low and her liver levels were too high

Tough: Sarah began chemotherapy treatment last year but recently revealed her last session was cancelled after her white blood cell count was too low and her liver levels were too high

Tough: Sarah began chemotherapy treatment last year but recently revealed her last session was cancelled after her white blood cell count was too low and her liver levels were too high

Family: Sarah has children Charlie, 16, Billy, 18, Rafferty, 14, and Laurie, 12, with her husband of 19 years Graham Swift

Family: Sarah has children Charlie, 16, Billy, 18, Rafferty, 14, and Laurie, 12, with her husband of 19 years Graham Swift

Family: Sarah has children Charlie, 16, Billy, 18, Rafferty, 14, and Laurie, 12, with her husband of 19 years Graham Swift 

Last week, she announced that she had finished chemotherapy by sharing a picture of her sons’ CD cover.

Sarah wrote: ‘Not sure what is making the sun shine the most – 2 days into steroids (happy pills!!!) – no more chemo or @the_entitled_sons releasing their best song yet…

‘YES Friday IS a good day xx #finishedchemo #HEAVENKNOWS @nickyjohnston (sic)’.

Back in the summer of 2022, Sarah revealed that she received the cancer diagnosis after finding a lump, which led to a biopsy.

She was told the cancer had not spread and ‘there is an 80 per cent chance of a cure’.

The star’s mother had breast cancer which spread to her brain and she died aged 39, when Sarah was ten.

Sarah admitted that she had ‘a little bit of a breakdown’ in the consultation room, but explained to the nurse: ‘You don’t understand. I have waited 40 years to hear those words. I knew I was going to hear it one day.’

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and affects more than two MILLION women a year

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Each year in the UK there are more than 55,000 new cases, and the disease claims the lives of 11,500 women. In the US, it strikes 266,000 each year and kills 40,000. But what causes it and how can it be treated?

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer develops from a cancerous cell which develops in the lining of a duct or lobule in one of the breasts.

When the breast cancer has spread into surrounding breast tissue it is called an ‘invasive’ breast cancer. Some people are diagnosed with ‘carcinoma in situ’, where no cancer cells have grown beyond the duct or lobule.

Most cases develop in women over the age of 50 but younger women are sometimes affected. Breast cancer can develop in men, though this is rare.

Staging means how big the cancer is and whether it has spread. Stage 1 is the earliest stage and stage 4 means the cancer has spread to another part of the body.

The cancerous cells are graded from low, which means a slow growth, to high, which is fast-growing. High-grade cancers are more likely to come back after they have first been treated.

What causes breast cancer?

A cancerous tumour starts from one abnormal cell. The exact reason why a cell becomes cancerous is unclear. It is thought that something damages or alters certain genes in the cell. This makes the cell abnormal and multiply ‘out of control’.

Although breast cancer can develop for no apparent reason, there are some risk factors that can increase the chance of developing breast cancer, such as genetics.

What are the symptoms of breast cancer?

The usual first symptom is a painless lump in the breast, although most breast lumps are not cancerous and are fluid filled cysts, which are benign. 

The first place that breast cancer usually spreads to is the lymph nodes in the armpit. If this occurs you will develop a swelling or lump in an armpit.

How is breast cancer diagnosed?

  • Initial assessment: A doctor examines the breasts and armpits. They may do tests such as a mammography, a special x-ray of the breast tissue which can indicate the possibility of tumours.
  • Biopsy: A biopsy is when a small sample of tissue is removed from a part of the body. The sample is then examined under a microscope to look for abnormal cells. The sample can confirm or rule out cancer.

If you are confirmed to have breast cancer, further tests may be needed to assess if it has spread. For example, blood tests, an ultrasound scan of the liver or a chest X-ray.

How is breast cancer treated?

Treatment options which may be considered include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormone treatment. Often a combination of two or more of these treatments are used.

  • Surgery: Breast-conserving surgery or the removal of the affected breast depending on the size of the tumour.
  • Radiotherapy: A treatment which uses high energy beams of radiation focused on cancerous tissue. This kills cancer cells, or stops cancer cells from multiplying. It is mainly used in addition to surgery.
  • Chemotherapy: A treatment of cancer by using anti-cancer drugs which kill cancer cells, or stop them from multiplying.
  • Hormone treatments: Some types of breast cancer are affected by the ‘female’ hormone oestrogen, which can stimulate the cancer cells to divide and multiply. Treatments which reduce the level of these hormones, or prevent them from working, are commonly used in people with breast cancer.

How successful is treatment?

The outlook is best in those who are diagnosed when the cancer is still small, and has not spread. Surgical removal of a tumour in an early stage may then give a good chance of cure.

The routine mammography offered to women between the ages of 50 and 70 means more breast cancers are being diagnosed and treated at an early stage.

For more information visit breastcancernow.org or call its free helpline on 0808 800 6000

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