Hedge fund manager’s wife goes viral with plans to combat cost of living crisis

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Hedge fund manager’s wife goes viral with plans to combat cost of living crisis

The wife of a hedge fund manager in London has been branded 'entitled' after she shared her plans to combat the cost of living crisis - including givi

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The wife of a hedge fund manager in London has been branded ‘entitled’ after she shared her plans to combat the cost of living crisis – including giving up her Audi and ironing her own clothes.

In an interview which went viral over the weekend, Jessica Keplinger, 38, from London, explained her cost-cutting plans, which included trading her £40,000 full-time nanny for a £10,000 au-pair for her son Teddy, three.

The interior designer, who is married to a hedge fund manager Werner, also told The Times she would swap her weekly £18 vegetable box for shopping at Ocado, and stop getting regular takeaways from upmarket restaurant Hakkasan.

The interview resurfaced after it was shared by stunned Twitter users, with one commenting: ‘Ditching the school run Audi A3 and ironing her own clothes. The absolute horror. I’m crying inside, honestly.’

Jessica Keplinger, 38, from London, went viral over the weekend after she shared her plans to combat the cost of living crisis - including giving up her Audi and ironing her own clothes (pictured with her husband Werner)

Jessica Keplinger, 38, from London, went viral over the weekend after she shared her plans to combat the cost of living crisis - including giving up her Audi and ironing her own clothes (pictured with her husband Werner)

Jessica Keplinger, 38, from London, went viral over the weekend after she shared her plans to combat the cost of living crisis – including giving up her Audi and ironing her own clothes (pictured with her husband Werner) 

The mother-of-one revealed that one of her main reasons for cutting back was that she and her husband had spent ‘huge sums’ moving from a three-bedroom flat in West Hampstead to a four-bedroom house in Kingston-Upon-Thames.

The couple had ambitions to renovate the kitchen and add an extension, however building and labour costs were above their £100,000 budget.  

During the interview, she explained she planned to give up her Audi A3, which she’s mainly been using for the school run.

Instead, she said she would look at hiring a Tesla for car journeys in order to cut costs.

The interior designer, who is married to a hedge fund manager Werner, also said she would swap her £18 vegetable box for Ocado and stopping regular takeaways from upmarket restaurant Hakkasan

The interior designer, who is married to a hedge fund manager Werner, also said she would swap her £18 vegetable box for Ocado and stopping regular takeaways from upmarket restaurant Hakkasan

The interior designer, who is married to a hedge fund manager Werner, also said she would swap her £18 vegetable box for Ocado and stopping regular takeaways from upmarket restaurant Hakkasan

Meanwhile she also revealed her plans to visit her local farmers’ market and iron her own clothes.

She said: ‘Food costs are one of the biggest expenses. In Austria, where my husband is from, shopping in Aldi and Lidl is much more common, and is cheaper.’ 

Jessica, who sends her three-year-old son Teddy to a German School where fees are £4,300 per term, said she would look to swap his nanny for an au pair.  

She explained: ‘I would look at my bank balance and think, crikey, that’s a lot of money to be spending on frivolous things.’

Other social media users were stunned by the interview, with many suggesting it had to be 'a parody'

Other social media users were stunned by the interview, with many suggesting it had to be 'a parody'

Other social media users were stunned by the interview, with many suggesting it had to be ‘a parody’ 

After the interview resurfaced online over the weekend, Jessica’s comments quickly went viral, with one person writing: ‘Lol…Jessica needs to grow up.’

Meanwhile another mockingly wrote: ‘Thoughts and prayers.’

A third added: ‘Genuinely thought this was a parody at first…I kinda wish it still was.’

A fourth wrote in a mocking tone: ‘These people don’t know how lucky they are. You want a story of real budget-squeeze?

‘I can no longer afford to heat my indoor swimming pool during the evenings, which means I can’t enjoy a late night dip.

The couple, who married in 2017, said one their main reasons for cutting back was they spent 'huge sums' moving from a three-bedroom flat in West Hampstead to a four-bedroom house in Kingston-Upon-Thames

The couple, who married in 2017, said one their main reasons for cutting back was they spent 'huge sums' moving from a three-bedroom flat in West Hampstead to a four-bedroom house in Kingston-Upon-Thames

The couple, who married in 2017, said one their main reasons for cutting back was they spent ‘huge sums’ moving from a three-bedroom flat in West Hampstead to a four-bedroom house in Kingston-Upon-Thames

‘Next thing you know, I’ll be forced to shop at M&S with the poor people,’ the mocking continued. 

Another added: ‘That has got to be parody.’

The interview, which was originally published in January, resurfaced again as showing figures showed Britons are drastically cutting back on meat and alcohol as the cost of living crisis engulfing the country bites.

Households spent 7.8% less on chicken, beef, pork and fish in the past month than the same time last year, according to data from Nielsen, with the volume of meat, fish and poultry falling by 13% last month in a sign that people are choosing to buy less expensive goods.

Among the changes Jessica said she planned to make was looking to swap her three-year-old's nanny for an au pair

Among the changes Jessica said she planned to make was looking to swap her three-year-old's nanny for an au pair

Among the changes Jessica said she planned to make was looking to swap her three-year-old’s nanny for an au pair

Recent figures from The British Retail Consortium showed that food inflation rose to 3.5% last month, though industry experts warned that the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the impact of soaring energy, oil and wheat prices could mean that food prices will be at least 15% higher by the end of the year.

Sainsbury’s chief executive Simon Roberts warned that consumers are ‘watching every penny’, while the boss of the Co-op warned that increasing feed prices, caused by higher grain prices, may mean that chicken could become as expensive as beef.

People are also facing a historic squeeze from rising energy and electricity bills, with the cost of filling up a car at eyewatering highs and about 40% of households finding it difficult to pay to heat up their homes.

Other recent official figures show that 44% of households said they had to spend more of their disposable income on their usual groceries.

And a further 2.2million people across 900,000 households will see their incomes fall below the Minimum Income Standard (MIS) this year compared to last, despite these families having average earnings from work of £33,000 before tax.

Research by the New Economics Foundation think-tank found that middle income families are ‘being newly pushed into crisis in unprecedented numbers’, with many of these families ‘making routine sacrifices on essentials like household bills, replacing clothes or a trip to the dentist for the first time’.

Modelling suggests that on average, price increases have pushed up the cost of an essential basket of goods and services by £2,300 a year.

The rise in costs for the poorest half of families is nine times larger than for the richest 5% as a proportion of income. 

Even for families in the middle of the income distribution, the rise in costs is six times larger than for the richest 5% as a proportion of income, the group adds.

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