Kathleen Folbigg may be looking for love as she’s pardoned and freed from jail after two decades, with prison letters emerging where she joked she could be a ‘danger to men’ due to years of pent-up ‘lust’.

The former convicted child killer, who got her first taste of freedom after walking from Grafton Correctional Centre on Monday, has written extensively from jail about what she would do when released.

In one letter, written nine years ago when she believed she was about to walk free, Folbigg wrote it was now ‘time … to find another love or at least a trusted companion for the remaining years I have left.

‘To hopefully remind me about LUST and all those glorious feelings that go with it.

‘LOL … I am a woman still, and since having years of delay in that department … I could be a danger to men and wish to make up for lost time, LOL.

‘Time to live a life of my choosing, to experience everything and love life.

‘I’m pretty sure I’ll still be able to handle that department. Well I hope so. I am quite rusty in that department for sure.

‘Know anyone that would fit … me?  They’d have to be pretty special to say the least. My list of requirements are pretty high. I’m sure I’ll most likely be way too shy!’

Folbigg wrote of her desires to her friend and supporter Tracey Chapman, in one of many letters released by the NSW Department of Communities and Justice during the inquiry which ultimately oversaw her release from jail today.

Kathleen Folbigg tastes freedom for the first time in 20 years - and according to prison latter s she may be looking for new love after her release on a state pardon

Kathleen Folbigg tastes freedom for the first time in 20 years - and according to prison latter s she may be looking for new love after her release on a state pardon

Kathleen Folbigg tastes freedom for the first time in 20 years – and according to prison latter s she may be looking for new love after her release on a state pardon

Letters Kathleen Folbigg (above)  wrote from prison reveal she could be a 'danger to men' with years of pent-up 'lust' from being locked up in jail

Letters Kathleen Folbigg (above)  wrote from prison reveal she could be a 'danger to men' with years of pent-up 'lust' from being locked up in jail

Letters Kathleen Folbigg (above)  wrote from prison reveal she could be a ‘danger to men’ with years of pent-up ‘lust’ from being locked up in jail

In this letter written nine years ago when Folbigg believed she had a chance at walking out of prison she write that 'it was now 'time ... to find another love. To hopefully remind me about LUST and all those glorious feelings that go with it'

In this letter written nine years ago when Folbigg believed she had a chance at walking out of prison she write that 'it was now 'time ... to find another love. To hopefully remind me about LUST and all those glorious feelings that go with it'

In this letter written nine years ago when Folbigg believed she had a chance at walking out of prison she write that ‘it was now ‘time … to find another love. To hopefully remind me about LUST and all those glorious feelings that go with it’

The inquiry by the Hon Justice Tom Bathurst KC found on Monday that there was reasonable doubt about Folbigg’s guilt in her 2003 conviction for the murder of three of her children and the manslaughter of one between 1989 and 1999.

Doubt was cast over the convictions by scientific evidence that her two daughters carried a genetic mutation that could cause fatal cardiac problems. The Bathurst inquiry heard credible evidence all her four children may have died of natural causes. 

Under this week’s pardon, Folbigg’s convictions were not quashed, but she was spared from serving the rest of her 30 year sentence.

The private letters written by Folbigg to her best friend revealed the then-reviled inmate’s greatest hopes even during her dark days of incarceration.

Folbigg hoped that on leaving prison she could ‘enjoy fresh uncaged air, no fences with barb (sic) wire … choice, liberty to choose interactions with other people.

Kathleen Folbigg (above on her wedding day with Craig, the father of her four doomed children)said in a letter that marriage was 'a sham' but after years in jail 'I could be a danger to men and wish to make up for lost time'

Kathleen Folbigg (above on her wedding day with Craig, the father of her four doomed children)said in a letter that marriage was 'a sham' but after years in jail 'I could be a danger to men and wish to make up for lost time'

Kathleen Folbigg (above on her wedding day with Craig, the father of her four doomed children)said in a letter that marriage was ‘a sham’ but after years in jail ‘I could be a danger to men and wish to make up for lost time’

‘I accept that I’m now always and forever … known as “that woman” who was jailed for killing her children. I’ll never escape that Trace.

‘I’m not bitter about that. All I want to do is live and live quietly like I used to or even better than I used to.’ 

In letters written between 2003 when she was first incarcerated up to 2016, Folbigg detailed life in jail, fight with other female inmates, tedious chores and prison routine as well as her hopes and dreams.

She described her marriage to the father of her four children who died, Craig Folbigg as ‘a sham’ and how her diaries had been misconstrued to make her out to be guilty of child murder.

Folbigg, 55, was found guilty of murder of her children Patrick, Sarah and Laura – aged from eight months to 19 months – and of the manslaughter of her first-born child, Caleb, who was just 19 days old. 

Kathleen Folbigg, (above before her 2003 conviction) has since spent two decades behind bars for the deaths of her children

Kathleen Folbigg, (above before her 2003 conviction) has since spent two decades behind bars for the deaths of her children

Kathleen Folbigg, (above before her 2003 conviction) has since spent two decades behind bars for the deaths of her children

Folbigg joked about being 'a jail bird' with the letter above and yearned for a life on the outside

Folbigg joked about being 'a jail bird' with the letter above and yearned for a life on the outside

In her letters Folbigg yearned for a life on the outside and a man to start a loving relationship

In her letters Folbigg yearned for a life on the outside and a man to start a loving relationship

Folbigg joked about being ‘a jail bird’ with the letter, above left, and yearned for a life on the outside and meeting a man with whom she could start a loving relationship

Her childhood friend Tracy Chapman – with whom Folbigg is expected to spend her first night on the outside with – was always adamant Folbigg was innocent and believed her correspondence proved it.

Many of the 32 letters submitted to the hearing sought to explain troubling passages in her diary at the time of their deaths, which was a key factor in the guilty verdicts. 

In one letter to Ms Chapman, Folbigg, admitted ‘some of my [diary] entries sound atrocious’. 

Folbigg wrote in 1997 before Laura’s death, ‘She’s a fairly good natured baby – Thank goodness, it has saved her from the fate of her siblings. I think she was warned…’

She told Ms Chapman in a 2005 letter ‘I probably exaggerated on my thoughts about them warning her’.

‘I still had weird thoughts stuck in my head about any possible reason why she would of left me. I grasped at anything Trace,’ she wrote.

‘If it wasn’t physical, medical, genetic what was it. I thought I was to blame, I blamed myself.” 

Folbigg was also convicted for murdering her son Patrick (pictured)

Folbigg was also convicted for murdering her son Patrick (pictured)

Folbigg was for the manslaughter death of her first-born son Caleb (pictured)

Folbigg was for the manslaughter death of her first-born son Caleb (pictured)

Folbigg was also convicted for murdering her son Patrick (pictured left) and the manslaughter death of her firstborn son Caleb (pictured right)

Regarding an infamous diary entry that stated 'I am my father's daughter', Folbigg claimed in a letter to Ms Chapman to have mixed up the order of her words

Regarding an infamous diary entry that stated 'I am my father's daughter', Folbigg claimed in a letter to Ms Chapman to have mixed up the order of her words

Regarding an infamous diary entry that stated ‘I am my father’s daughter’, Folbigg claimed in a letter to Ms Chapman to have mixed up the order of her words

Folbigg wrote in the diary that Laura's 'good nature' had 'saved her from the fate of her siblings' and 'I think she was warned'. In a letter to Ms Chapman, Folbigg walked back part of that diary entry

Folbigg wrote in the diary that Laura's 'good nature' had 'saved her from the fate of her siblings' and 'I think she was warned'. In a letter to Ms Chapman, Folbigg walked back part of that diary entry

Folbigg wrote in the diary that Laura’s ‘good nature’ had ‘saved her from the fate of her siblings’ and ‘I think she was warned’. In a letter to Ms Chapman, Folbigg walked back part of that diary entry

Folbigg was convicted of the murder of her daughter Sarah (pictured)

Folbigg was convicted of the murder of her daughter Sarah (pictured)

Folbigg was also convicted of the murder of her daughter Laura (pictured)

Folbigg was also convicted of the murder of her daughter Laura (pictured)

Folbigg was convicted of the murders of Sarah (left) and Laura (pictured right) along with her two sons, but scientists later said Folbigg should be pardoned because the two girls’ deaths could be explained by genetics

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