Pictures reveal how once-bustling Easter Show is a deserted ghost town because of coronavirus 

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Pictures reveal how once-bustling Easter Show is a deserted ghost town because of coronavirus 

The halls and grounds of Sydney's Olympic Park should be heaving this week for the Royal Easter Show but instead resemble a sad ghost town; yet anothe

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The halls and grounds of Sydney’s Olympic Park should be heaving this week for the Royal Easter Show but instead resemble a sad ghost town; yet another victim of the coronavirus lockdown.

Australia’s largest carnival overflows with excited kids collecting showbags, teenagers queuing for rides and proud country folk showing off their animals and produce.

But not this year, with the government ordering a ban on non-essential public gatherings to contain the spread of COVID-19.

Show bag booth packed families and kids. vendors sell cute colourful merchandise at cheap price in package in 2019

Show bag booth packed families and kids. vendors sell cute colourful merchandise at cheap price in package in 2019

Show bag booth packed families and kids. vendors sell cute colourful merchandise at cheap price in package in 2019

Carnival rides including big slider which is popular in Sydney's largest event held in Sydney Olympic park, great for family fun day

Carnival rides including big slider which is popular in Sydney's largest event held in Sydney Olympic park, great for family fun day

Carnival rides including big slider which is popular in Sydney’s largest event held in Sydney Olympic park, great for family fun day

The view of Swing ride tower and Ferris wheel at Sydney Royal Easter Show. thousands of families from all over the country would flock to the famous show

The view of Swing ride tower and Ferris wheel at Sydney Royal Easter Show. thousands of families from all over the country would flock to the famous show

The view of Swing ride tower and Ferris wheel at Sydney Royal Easter Show. thousands of families from all over the country would flock to the famous show

The Show, which usually attracts an average of 850,000 people over the school holidays and Easter, could not continue under the new laws and joined sports, pubs, cinemas and many other forms of entertainment that had been mothballed.

It had been estimated that more than a million employees had lost their jobs as most businesses were either ordered to shut or chose to put up shutters due to lack of customers.

Outdoor gatherings are now limited to two people, with Australians urged to stay home except for a few essential purposes: shopping for necessities, taking daily exercise or travelling to work for those who cannot do their job at home.

New South Wales and Victoria have also enacted additional measures to allow police the power to fine people who breach the two-person outdoor gathering limit or leave their homes without a reasonable excuse.  

Slide me

The High Country Pony Rides tents is seen empty and closed, a stark comparison to past years where the tent is bustling with families and children riding the animals

An empty Murchison Pavilion which usually houses the cattle and alpaca pavilion during the Royal Easter Show is seen at the Sydney Showground on Tuesday

An empty Murchison Pavilion which usually houses the cattle and alpaca pavilion during the Royal Easter Show is seen at the Sydney Showground on Tuesday

An empty Murchison Pavilion which usually houses the cattle and alpaca pavilion during the Royal Easter Show is seen at the Sydney Showground on Tuesday

The empty Grand Parade is seen at the Sydney Showground at Sydney Olympic Park in Sydney on April 7

The empty Grand Parade is seen at the Sydney Showground at Sydney Olympic Park in Sydney on April 7

The empty Grand Parade is seen at the Sydney Showground at Sydney Olympic Park in Sydney on April 7

The show has become synonymous with old fashioned family fun, with children scouring newspapers weeks before the show to pick their choice of showbag.

Pictures taken of Olympic Park show the desolated showground and the stark reality of how the coronavirus pandemic has hit the country.

An empty Murchison Pavilion which usually houses the cattle and alpaca pavilion during the Royal Easter Show is seen at the Sydney Showground on Tuesday.

The pavilion is usually packed with families finding joy in the farm animals but it now stands empty.

Slide me

Before and after: The woodchopping competition used to pull in large crowds. The stadium remains empty as COVID-29 forces Australia into lockdown

Workers were pictured removing the crates in the stables area on Tuesday, usually used for farm animal shows during the event

Workers were pictured removing the crates in the stables area on Tuesday, usually used for farm animal shows during the event

Workers were pictured removing the crates in the stables area on Tuesday, usually used for farm animal shows during the event

The rodeo chutes are seen in the area usually used as the horse marshaling yard during the Royal Easter Show at the Sydney Showground

The rodeo chutes are seen in the area usually used as the horse marshaling yard during the Royal Easter Show at the Sydney Showground

The rodeo chutes are seen in the area usually used as the horse marshaling yard during the Royal Easter Show at the Sydney Showground

The Downs Pavilion is seen filled with crates rather than the horses and cattle.

Signs outside the pavillion warn people to wash their hands after touching the animals – a year before the World Health Organisation began urging people wash their hands in an attempt to stop the spread of the virus.

Workers were pictured removing the crates in the stables area on Tuesday.

The High Country Pony Rides tents is seen empty and closed, a stark comparison to past years where the tent is bustling with families and children riding the animals.

Signs warning people to wash their hands after touching the animals - a reminder as the World Health Organisation is urging people wash their hands in an attempt to stop the spread of the virus

Signs warning people to wash their hands after touching the animals - a reminder as the World Health Organisation is urging people wash their hands in an attempt to stop the spread of the virus

Signs warning people to wash their hands after touching the animals – a reminder as the World Health Organisation is urging people wash their hands in an attempt to stop the spread of the virus

The empty dog judging lawn area is seen at the Sydney Showground on April 7. The dog show was a show favourite for families and dog-lovers

The empty dog judging lawn area is seen at the Sydney Showground on April 7. The dog show was a show favourite for families and dog-lovers

The empty dog judging lawn area is seen at the Sydney Showground on April 7. The dog show was a show favourite for families and dog-lovers

The Downs Pavilion is seen filled with crates rather than the horses and cattle. First held in 1823, the Sydney Royal Easter Show usually attracts an average of 850,000 people each year

The Downs Pavilion is seen filled with crates rather than the horses and cattle. First held in 1823, the Sydney Royal Easter Show usually attracts an average of 850,000 people each year

The Downs Pavilion is seen filled with crates rather than the horses and cattle. First held in 1823, the Sydney Royal Easter Show usually attracts an average of 850,000 people each year

An empty Schmidt Arena usually used for horse sports during the Royal Easter Show is seen completely deserted while rodeo chutes usually used for horse marshalling are still in storage.

The deserted tent of ‘The Shed’ usually used for farming demonstrations during the festivities is seen already set up.

The lockdown will likely leave Australia’s economy in tatters for years to come.

You can still get your hands on all your favourite SHOWBAGS 

By Matilda Rudd

Chicane Showbags, who are famous for creating the Bertie Beetle chocolate bag, were disappointed by the news their creations were going to be withheld from fans, so they’ve decided to sell them online from Tuesday March 24 in honour of the show. 

‘We are devastated to hear the sad news the Sydney Royal Easter Show won’t be going ahead in 2020,’ the company wrote on their website.

‘We have been planning this for the last 12 months and were so excited to bring you the best range of showbags ever (in our humble opinion). While this is a big blow for our small business, we understand the health of Australians is the most important thing.’

Chicane said they understand a number of people were wondering if they could still get their hands on the Violet Crumble, Simpsons or My Little Pony bags – and they weren’t going to be the ones to let anyone down.

‘We are working on having as many of our showbag brands available for sale on our online shop – we have a bunch of brands available now and we will aim to get more of our range available over the coming week or two,’ it read.

‘We are also working on some other ideas on how we can still distribute our showbags to you so please standby and more news will come.’

Chicane is currently selling their full range of Bertie Beetle bags, including one that contains 350 Bertie Beetle chocolates for $99, so you won’t run out anytime soon.

Visit the Chicane website for more information.

 

 You can still buy:

 * Bertie Beetle Triple Deal ($8)

* Bertie Beetle Diamond Deal ($15)

* Stella Athletic ($28)

* ROXY Showbag ($30)

* The Simpsons ($26)

* Star Wars ($26)

* My Little Pony ($15)

* Sailor Moon ($26) 

* Sydney FC ($22)

* Garfield ($26)

* My Kitchen Rules ($25)

* Home and Away ($28)

* The BIG Nestle Family Deal ($20)

* Violet Crumble ($12)

* Smarties ($15)

* Minties ($12)

The federal government has so far pledged $320 billion in stimulus packages to save the economy – which is teetering on the brink of a crisis following the dismantling of all tourism and the closure of the hospitality industry.

The industries worst impacted by the pandemic in Australia – and globally – have been the tourism industry; airlines, travel agents and cruise liners, hospitality and the retail sector.

While Prime Minister Scott Morrison never officially closed retail stores, many were forced to close as the government imposed strict stay at home orders urging people to leave their houses only for necessities.

Gyms and personal trainers, as well as beauticians and people employed in the events industry have also been detrimentally impacted, while teachers and childcare workers feel their safety and well-being is being toyed with as their forced to continue working during the pandemic.

News Corp also made 60 suburban and regional titles across NSW, Victoria, Queensland and South Australia digital-only from this week.

Executive chairman Michael Miller said the decision had been forced on the company due to the rapid decline in advertising.

 

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