Pregnant woman ‘really worried’ about recovering alone following C-section

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Pregnant woman ‘really worried’ about recovering alone following C-section

A pregnant mother-of-one, who's due to give birth later this month by planned C-section has confessed she's terrified about having surgery during lock

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A pregnant mother-of-one, who’s due to give birth later this month by planned C-section has confessed she’s terrified about having surgery during lock-down – because her husband won’t be allowed to stay with her. 

Gemma Summers, from Chelmsford, appeared on This Morning today to share her fears that although her husband can stay throughout the birth, he will be sent home almost immediately afterwards for fear of him, or Gemma and the baby, catching coronavirus.  

Gemma told Holly Willoughby and Phillip Schofield that she’s scared of having to recover alone, and endured a ‘traumatic’ birth with her first child, which is heightening her current anxiety. 

She said she was left suffering with PTSD after her experience of labour and had only recently been able to ‘feel comfortable’ going into hospitals.

She confessed she’s worried about ‘hassling’ already-stretched NHS staff after her operation will leave her ‘unable to sit up on her own’ and is considering discharging herself early, against medical advice. 

Mum-to-be Gemma Summers (pictured), from Chelmsford, appeared on This Morning today where she spoke about her fears over her planned C-section later this month

Mum-to-be Gemma Summers (pictured), from Chelmsford, appeared on This Morning today where she spoke about her fears over her planned C-section later this month

Mum-to-be Gemma Summers (pictured), from Chelmsford, appeared on This Morning today where she spoke about her fears over her planned C-section later this month 

Advising Gemma, This Morning's resident doctor Dr. Philippa Kaye (pictured) appeared from her East London home to offer reassuring advice

Advising Gemma, This Morning's resident doctor Dr. Philippa Kaye (pictured) appeared from her East London home to offer reassuring advice

Advising Gemma, This Morning’s resident doctor Dr. Philippa Kaye (pictured) appeared from her East London home to offer reassuring advice

She said:  ‘I’ve got an appointment with the consultant next week to go through it, because my last birth was a normal birth, so we don’t know what to expect at the moment.

‘I had a midwife appointment last week. They told me my husband can be there for the birth, hold the baby then he’ll have to go home. We won’t see him until I’m discharged.’ 

She added that her anxiety is ten-fold by the complications she had during her first delivery, and said being alone has only made her more scared.  

‘If my last birth was okay, I’d feel okay about it, or a tiny bit better, said Gemma,  ‘But it was really traumatic. I had PTSD after it.

The mother-of-one admitted she's scared to recover alone, after the 'traumatic' birth of her first child left her suffering PTSD

The mother-of-one admitted she's scared to recover alone, after the 'traumatic' birth of her first child left her suffering PTSD

The mother-of-one admitted she’s scared to recover alone, after the ‘traumatic’ birth of her first child left her suffering PTSD

Gemma told hosts Holly Willoughby and Phillip Schofield (pictured top right and left) she's worried about 'hassling' already stretched NHS staff after her operation will leave her 'unable to sit up on her own'

Gemma told hosts Holly Willoughby and Phillip Schofield (pictured top right and left) she's worried about 'hassling' already stretched NHS staff after her operation will leave her 'unable to sit up on her own'

Gemma told hosts Holly Willoughby and Phillip Schofield (pictured top right and left) she’s worried about ‘hassling’ already stretched NHS staff after her operation will leave her ‘unable to sit up on her own’

‘I’ve only just managed to feel comfortable going into the hospital anyway. But now the fact I’ll be on my own has made it even more of an anxious time really.’ 

She went on to explain that she fears being a hindrance on already-overworked staff, as she’ll be unable to feed her baby, pick up her child, or even sit up on her own following the procedure.  

‘I’m quite worried that the midwives are already stretched as it is, said Gemma. 

‘After a C-section, you can’t sit up on your own, feed the baby, pick the baby up and you don’t want to keep hassling them when they have lots to do anyway. 

‘I’m really worried about that the recovery afterwards. I’ve looked into how quickly I can discharge myself to see if I can get out earlier. They’ve said I can discharge against medical advice If I want to.’ 

Dr. Philippa told Gemma to express her fears to her consultant, as they may be able to allow her husband to stay for longer

Dr. Philippa told Gemma to express her fears to her consultant, as they may be able to allow her husband to stay for longer

Dr. Philippa told Gemma to express her fears to her consultant, as they may be able to allow her husband to stay for longer 

Advising Gemma, This Morning’s resident doctor, Dr. Philippa Kaye, appeared from her East London home, where she told Gemma to express her fears to her consultant. 

She said: ‘We know how all the hormones around pregnancy and the expectation of pregnancy and delivery and afterwards have a really significant impact on a woman’s mental health. Having the support of a partner during delivery is really important. 

‘So much so that the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists have put out guidance to hospitals, saying patients must be allowed one birth partner. You are allowed one birth partner, it’s up to hospitals about after the delivery. 

She continued: ‘In a situation like this, where it’s been a really traumatic birth – when you see your consultant, I would really talk about those fears. 

‘Really talk about them, because it may be if you’re in a side-room, the birth partner can come and see you afterwards – but you will get support both in and out of a hospital.’ 

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