While not ranking in the same bracket as rape or violent assault, burglary is still horrendous. To have your home invaded and ransacked is a frightening experience.

How damning then that the police are so unlikely to arrest a culprit that the public feels this profoundly traumatic crime has effectively been decriminalised.

In a report today, a retired senior detective says this is evidence that policing in Britain, troublingly soft-touch, has ‘lost its way’.

Senior officers appear to have lost sight of their basic role: To catch and deter criminals. The result? Offenders are emboldened to break the law.

While not ranking in the same bracket as rape or violent assault, burglary is still horrendous. To have your home invaded and ransacked is a frightening experience. How damning then that the police are so unlikely to arrest a culprit that the public feels this profoundly traumatic crime has effectively been decriminalised. A stock image is used above [File photo]

While not ranking in the same bracket as rape or violent assault, burglary is still horrendous. To have your home invaded and ransacked is a frightening experience. How damning then that the police are so unlikely to arrest a culprit that the public feels this profoundly traumatic crime has effectively been decriminalised. A stock image is used above [File photo]

While not ranking in the same bracket as rape or violent assault, burglary is still horrendous. To have your home invaded and ransacked is a frightening experience. How damning then that the police are so unlikely to arrest a culprit that the public feels this profoundly traumatic crime has effectively been decriminalised. A stock image is used above [File photo]

And is it any wonder? Faced with eco-extremists blockading a fuel depot in Essex, police chiefs expressed sympathy with their cause. And despite a young man being stabbed to death at the Notting Hill Carnival, with six others knifed and 200 arrested, Scotland Yard blithely insisted the event was ‘largely good-natured’.

The report, by the Policy Exchange think-tank, sets out imaginative ideas to improve detection rates, shake forces out of their complacency and ditch wokery – and repair the broken relationship between the police and the law-abiding public.

This time next week Britain will have a new prime minister. Such a sensible, forward-thinking report should be near the top of their reading list.

Taken for fuels

From exorbitant parking charges to sky-high road tax, it’s little wonder motorists feel like cash cows.

Now vehicle owners are the victims of another racket. And the expression ‘highway robbery’ has seldom seemed more apt.

A Mail investigation has discovered unscrupulous fuel giants have been cashing in on the August Bank Holiday getaway by whacking up pump prices, while failing to fully pass on falls in the cost of petrol after it rocketed because of the war in Ukraine.

Filling up a family car costs £22 more at some forecourts. But what choice do already squeezed motorists have? Either top up the tank – or sit, out of fuel, at the roadside.

By pledging to approve more licences for firms to drill for North Sea oil if she becomes PM, Liz Truss would ease the burden – although it will take time.

Until then, ministers must demand petrol station operators end the rip-off. After all, motorists are voters, not wallets on wheels.

Moaning Meghan

With each narcissistic utterance to American lifestyle magazine The Cut, Meghan Markle demonstrates bottomless levels of hypocrisy and arrogance.

If she and Prince Harry are so obsessed with their privacy, why spill their secrets – including more barbs at the Royal Family – to a journalist at their California mansion?

If she believes so deeply in the virtue of forgiveness, why is no score too small for her to settle – imagined or not?

If she believes so deeply in the virtue of forgiveness, why is no score too small for her to settle – imagined or not?

If she believes so deeply in the virtue of forgiveness, why is no score too small for her to settle – imagined or not?

If she believes so deeply in the virtue of forgiveness, why is no score too small for her to settle – imagined or not?

And her boast that her wedding to a white prince triggered similar celebrations to the ending of apartheid in South Africa is both delusional and disrespectful.

True, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s antics will delight their bosses at Netflix and Spotify. But millions more are finding it increasingly difficult to stomach the self-obsessed pair profiting from the name of the monarchy they relentlessly vilify.

  • Being a policy and personality black hole, it’s easy to see why the knives are out for Sir Keir Starmer. It’s no secret Andy Burnham, Greater Manchester’s ambitious mayor, wants to replace Labour’s leader, who has angered the unions by not explicitly backing strikes crippling the country. By contrast, Mr Burnham courts the hard Left by saying he would happily join them on the picket line. This is Labour’s true, ugly face. Putting their union paymasters’ interests before those of the long-suffering public.
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